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Brake cooling ducts

Flash

Proven Member
3,362
11
Nov 30, 2003
Highlands Ranch, Colorado
The only thing I could see is getting ahold of some of those test strips based that they sell. They'll only show the peak temperatures of the calipers probably, but that should at least be indicative of the change. I doubt you're going to see 400 degre drops, but if you can keep the fluid from boiling that's better than any numbers anyone could ever give me anyways.

I appreciate your help, Kyle.
Alcon makes the strips you are referring to. Pads work in a certain temperature ranges, the data could help determine how much cooling you really need.
People haven't touched much on fluid, or they haven't listed the fluid brand when they posted that they need more cooling. There is so much variability between brands of fluid.
It makes sense to me to think there should be cooling to keep the pads at their operating temperature #1. I just see it as pointless to over cool race pads down to 200C (extreme case, definitely out of operating temp range) just to keep fluid from boiling... If you have to keep your pads from reaching the desired operating temperature to avoid fluid boiling, then you might need to change to a better fluid.
 

cioc

Proven Member
203
33
Aug 2, 2006
Sparta, New_Jersey
I've boiled just about every fluid out there...the last being Motul 600RBF. I haven't tried their new 660 but I can tell you that I've even purchased titanium backing plates for my pads to help further dissipate heat and they didn't work either. When I go to the track, all of the serious cars have brake ducts and most of them probably weigh 500lbs less than my car. The proof is in the pedal feel and while I have no real data, I can tell you that I am VERY happy that I did this mod.
 

cioc

Proven Member
203
33
Aug 2, 2006
Sparta, New_Jersey
PFC-01

From Stoptech's site:

PFC 01 is a full race pad with high average torque output. It has a flat torque output over its operating temperature range and a rising torque output over its operating pressure range. 01 exhibits excellent bite, low pad and rotor wear, and an MOT of 2,000°F. It is the pad of choice for top SPEED World Challenge teams.
 

underradar92

Proven Member
1,002
19
Oct 19, 2005
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Alcon makes the strips you are referring to. Pads work in a certain temperature ranges, the data could help determine how much cooling you really need.
People haven't touched much on fluid, or they haven't listed the fluid brand when they posted that they need more cooling. There is so much variability between brands of fluid.
It makes sense to me to think there should be cooling to keep the pads at their operating temperature #1. I just see it as pointless to over cool race pads down to 200C (extreme case, definitely out of operating temp range) just to keep fluid from boiling... If you have to keep your pads from reaching the desired operating temperature to avoid fluid boiling, then you might need to change to a better fluid.
The fluid shouldn't be seeing anywhere near the temps the faces of the pads see, there is also temp paint for the rotors, there should be a BIG difference in the 2 temp readings.

The rotor temp. paint and the caliper strips are both available at Pegasus.
 

mavisky

DSM Wiseman
5,382
23
Sep 13, 2002
Atlanta, Georgia
While I fully understand and am intrigued by your efforts to attempt to quantify this data, in the end I'm not so certain that it will really matter.

Given a car like Rory's here with a front splitter and NACA ducts on the sides of the bumper feeding the air to a set of aftermarket brakes will receive vastly different cooling numbers than someone using the foglight holes and a larger scoop with bigger piping while feeding the stock 2 piston brakes. There are so many variables in vent location, air routing, aerodynamics, brake size, wheel size that you'd need a huge sampling of data to be able to draw any accurate conclusions. Right now though we can effectively say with the data that's already been given to us that doing some sort of air ducting to the braking system is advantageous, but trying to quantify how advantageous is going to rely too heavily on all those variables to be able to hypothetically "build" a system in your head and know how well it will work.
 

All_Boost16G

Proven Member
212
0
Oct 22, 2007
Sheldahl, Iowa
I was wondering if anyone have thought up maybe a electric fan solution. Maybe if it was possible to mount some sort of little fan almost like on the back of a computer, but defintally flow more, but mount it on the dustshield, then instead of having 3 inch duct trying to run to the rotor, you could just have a couple wires.
 

Ludachris

Founder & Zookeeper
7,920
2,570
Nov 12, 2001
Newcastle, California
Just a quick update - I just sent Forge an email seeing if they'll send me out one of their Evo ducts to do some test fitting:
Forge Motorsport | Alloy Fabrication

I still haven't tried making my own. I figured I'd see if I can get a vendor to make some for us. They're expensive, but they're really nice too. I'll let you know what I hear back.
 

dieselsdad

Proven Member
31
0
Mar 9, 2009
Searcy, Arkansas
You would be surprised how easy it is to weld a round pipe to your backing plate. Make the pipe oval where it attaches to the plate and leave it round so the hose can attach. We've been doing it for years on all of our cars.
 
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