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How to add a DSM IAC to any aftermarket throttle body

One of the biggest downfalls to a aftermarket throttle body is the fact that it's incredibly difficult to obtain a rock solid idle because they don't have provisions for our OE IAC motor. This article shows one way to add your IAC back into the system no matter which TB you run.

This install is on my buddy Dan's 1G, which runs a '96+ 4.6L Mustang throttle body. It has no IAC provisions and his car struggles to idle.

First things first; search the web for part number "E9T170". (Credit to Nicole Decker on the DSM Tuners Facebook page for sharing this part) It's an Evap purge control valve that Nissan used to control emissions on some of their models. Basically all it is is a Mitsubishi made stepper motor (ISC motor) mounted in an external housing. There are many on eBay right now for under $50. Some are a plastic housing and some are aluminum - either housing should work but I'd recommend getting the aluminum housing one so that you can use parts of the sensor as well (more on this later). I paid $25 shipped for the one that I bought.


Pics of the housing:

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And here's a comparision of the stepper motors. Notice the differences. The tip that seals in the housing is different. As is the electrical connector.

DSM on the left, Nissan on the right.

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So, this means we need to use parts of both to make it work. We need to use the lower housing of the Nissan motor along with the upper half of the DSM one. Start by removing the three screws on the top side.

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99gst_racer

Moderator
11,946
1,388
Apr 5, 2003
Coloma, Michigan
Again, use the Nissan bottom half along with the DSM top half. This way we get it to seat and seal properly in the housing and we also don't have to change the electrical plug either. There's a small spring inside that may fall out. If it falls out, just drop it back in down the center of the top half before screwing it back together. And when it's together, go ahead and bolt it into the housing.

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Now that the sensor is ready, all that is left is to drill and tap a couple holes. Basically you want a port on each side of the throttle plate. We drilled a tapped for 1/4" NPT. My local hardware store had the tap and we used a 7/16" drill bit. Aeroquip offers the fittings. They are 3/8" barb to 1/4" NPT, part number FBM1207. Once the holes are drilled and tapped, install the fittings with a bit of teflon tape.

Another excellent option here would be to weld on female bungs to offer more thread engagement. We opted not to do that only because the manifold and TB were already powdercoated.

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Mount the steppper motor wherever you'd like and run your 3/8" hoses. And that's it. Now enjoy a functional ISC again!

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99gst_racer

Moderator
11,946
1,388
Apr 5, 2003
Coloma, Michigan
I wanted to make a follow-up on this, as I still get many messages asking about it. truth be told, we didn't spend enough time testing and using this. It was on the car for a short period of time before Dan swapped to a different throttle body. While it did work, it didn't work great and we didn't spend enough time dialing it in. I think part of why it didn't work great with us was due to the long hoses we used. I think it would be best to use as short if hoses as possible to reduce internal volume and also reduce response time.

If anyone else has messed with this more in depth than we did, I'd love to hear about it. Please message me.
 
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