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What makes the bumps less jarring?

ipWitan

Proven Member
33
8
May 31, 2022
MARBLEHEAD, Massachusetts
I am still in the double check all things maintenance-wise with my 99 GST Spyder that I stored with my folks for 12 years, and just shipped up to NE... It has 86k miles and is due for lots of maintenance checks.

As a side issue, I noticed the car is leaking oil. I cannot tell where it is coming from and will have the repair shop take a look. Whatever the problem turns out to be, highly unlikely I can fix it myself. But while it is there, I plan on having them look at the suspension, too. I want to make sure I ask the right questions...if that makes sense. I am still trying to make sure the mechanic is right for the car - one of the guys in the shop has a 99 GSX, so that was a plus - but I haven't gone all in with the shop yet.

In looking at the suspension, if something is wore out and needs replacing, is there something that one upgrades to make the roads seem less crappy? For example, if they are replacing one part, does it make sense to replace/repair/upgrade something else while they are at it? Frankly, I am not entirely sure of the relationship of things like the suspension, shock absorbers, coils, the tires/wheels size, etc.? The car is stock with no plans to race. My Honda Pilot and Tesla Model Y don't seem to feel the road like the Eclipse does, and I don't know what it is that makes those cars ride smoother, besides being a modern day car. I just fear someone hitting a pot hole and the car breaks apart.

I do have aftermarket 18 x 8 wheels and low profile tire. I know those make the right harder - wasn't an issue in Miami...
 

Xarzor

Supporting Member
66
32
Jul 21, 2020
Denver, Colorado
These cars like to leak at the oil pan and turbo oil drain lines. Pretty easy fixes.

For the ride quality. Comparing it to a cross over or a Tesla isn't quite fair. These are at their core an economy car. Not really built for a nice quiet ride. I think you answered your own question. It seems the north east roads are the problem. I've never been there but I've heard they're not the best. I would say going to a smaller wheel and larger tire sidewall would be the most help for your situation.
 
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ipWitan

Proven Member
33
8
May 31, 2022
MARBLEHEAD, Massachusetts
Thanks. I was hoping for a different answer, though.

I see all of these pictures of car p0rn on this site. When I look at the under the hood pics, it looks nothing like mine... I don't even know what all those parts are for. Is it performance enhancing or cosmetic? Sometimes I wonder what was the reason for that big headlight upgrade. Does it make for a better right or is it just get eyeballs on the target.

PS all metaphors are intentional, unless you are the moderator in which case I have no idea what you are talking about.
 

Xarzor

Supporting Member
66
32
Jul 21, 2020
Denver, Colorado
I'm definitely not a moderator. Understanding the relationship of each part of the suspension and how it operates might be better found in a two minute youtube video. To further answer your question on what you can do for ride quality is to keep it as stock as possible. 99% of modifications are going to decrease ride quality unless you go with an air ride suspension.

As far as the under hood items I would say it's both performance and cosmetic. A painted valve cover provides no performance but looks cool. A tubular turbo manifold is for preformence but also looks cool. Performance parts are cool. I would argue 90% of people put aftermarket wheels on thier cars not for performance but cosmetics. We like making our cars unique to us.
 

randman2011

Proven Member
516
238
Feb 26, 2012
Indianapolis, Indiana
Is any part of your suspension aftermarket? Loose ball joints and bushings will give you an unpleasant ride but I'm thinking mostly about springs and dampers. Being poorly matched in either direction will give you a shit ride, so look for aftermarket or blown shocks. Most coilovers go overboard on the damping, which will give you a stiff, bumpy ride with no actual benefit. If everything is stock (or OE-replacement) and healthy, then that's about as good as it gets. You can get higher performing suspension components that keep the stock ride quality, but you'd be hard pressed to find anything off-the-shelf that would be smoother than that. It can be done, but it would probably be custom.

Also, not a fair comparison just due to the difference in vehicle weights. It's trivial to make a heavy car ride smoothly, just like it's trivial to make a light car handle well. But making a heavy car handle well and making a light car ride smoothly are difficult. Not that DSMs are light at all, but compared to a large crossover and an EV crossover it'll feel like a Miata.
 

DogWhistle

Supporting VIP
831
355
Sep 13, 2012
St. Paul, Minnesota
We have been shocked (punny!) at times of the poor ride quality of our ‘99 Spyder. We’re on 16” rims and performance tires, but hitting pot holes can make you regret which car was choosen that day.

Thinking it was as simple as damper replacement and an alignment, we install Koni Adjustable Yellows. Even on the softest setting the jarring continued. If anything, it made is more noticeable.

With new tires on the way, we’re also going to replace the front hubs and the bushings in the front suspension.

It does come down to the fact that DSMs are soft in front and rear rigidity and the twisty cabin of a convertible doesn’t help. The “basic” lightweight construction of a DSM, especially the convertible, can’t stay stiff enough to let the suspension pieces fully respond.
 
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