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2G Install Exhaust manifold for a Beginner?

USMCGSX

Probationary Member
14
10
Mar 28, 2020
Riverside, California
I would recommend you use anti-seize on all the torque points. The FSM doesn't specify any torque sequence, but I generally hand tighten then work my way from center outward for the manifold to head.
LeYMPpy.jpg
 

ec17pse

Freelancer
5,060
2,306
Nov 1, 2008
London, UK, Europe
When i first did a manifold i had already worked on cars for years but a turbo car was different to me. Its a little cramped in there and its best to disconnect the battery as your right near the alternators power wire. Some bits can be tricky but its not as bad as some other cars thats for sure. Just take your time. If you think its tight do it back up and try not to snap the old studs off.

A good idea is to replace the nuts with copper flashed exhaust nuts as they are softer and take the heat better and will never ruin studs. I use them on everything hot and currently never had an issue thus far thankfully
 

Kai Hefner

Freelancer
447
204
Jun 21, 2018
Calgary, AB_Canada
Echoing above. Head studs are pretty easy, I throw a little loctite on the studs before I throw them in. Peace of mind knowing they won't back out.
A good idea is to replace the nuts with copper flashed exhaust nuts as they are softer and take the heat better and will never ruin studs. I use them on everything hot and currently never had an issue thus far thankfully
This, plus they make everything look much cleaner than your stock rusted nuts.
No tightening sequence but I usually tighten all of the studs to 20-ft-lbs, then to 36-40. Stripping one of the manifold stud holes will ruin your day.
 

Mech Addict

Supporting Member
474
173
Jun 9, 2019
Jackson, Wyoming
I did mine last winter, and the very last one got kind of tight, and then kept turning. I've left it that way for now, but will have to helicoil or oversize in the future when I have the head off. I used one of those stud-remover tools (Lysle, others) that takes a 1/2 drive on one end. The stud goes into a bore in the tool, and when turned, it has a cammed/ serrated wheel that grips the stud and turns it. All mine came out fine, including two that were already broken. I used an OEM set of replacements, including those cool copper nuts (they all turn a silvery color after they get hot once, but interestingly, the one that did not torque up stayed copper colored). With old rusty nuts on it when you start, you might actually get some studs to back out, instead of the nuts threading off. I didn't use antiseize, but did use sealant in the one center stud that penetrates the water jacket in the head. It's called out in the FSM. I had my manifold and turbo all still bolted as one unit. It was pretty easy. The exhaust manifold gasket is not reversible!! (found out after swearing like hell on why it was so poorly made; it was perfect and I was poorly made).
 

AMSOIL Dlr #352885

Proven Member
42
12
Dec 1, 2020
Grimesland, North_Carolina
To get red high strength locktite to release properly without thread damage, Heat should be applied to hardware to warm it up, and this makes thread locker release safely.

So if that is the removal rule of thumb, It would seem that every time the car runs due to Exhaust temps, the locktite would loose it's ability to keep stud properly locked in place.

Most studs I have replaced on heads:
1) Make sure the threads in head are CLEAN
2) Make sure threads are NOT Damaged & same for new /used stud.
3) Clean hole w/ thread chaser or thread restorer, Brake clean hole, blow out w/ air
4) Dry thread install unless specified otherwise by OEM or Hardware manufacturer
5) Use stud installer that looks like clamped die or Double nut the Stud and Torque to Spec for that diameter hardware.
6) Use quality hardware NOT CHINESE or CHEAP hardware, Grade 5 or OEM, Studs might even be grade 8. I normally use OEM.
7) Wet torque spec is lower than dry due to reduced friction on threads- BE Careful: ALIMINIUM is easy to strip!

Stud bolt grade would be a great question for ARP.
ARP would also have Quality hardware for this application.

If stud hole is not a blind hole, then absolutely use the type of sealer recommended by OEM.
GM I-6 292 C.I.D. had same issues of coolant leaking past stud threads years ago on new engines, when I worked for UPS as Fleet Journey Mech.
 

Bdi

Probationary Member
16
2
Nov 30, 2020
Glendale heights, Illinois
When i first did a manifold i had already worked on cars for years but a turbo car was different to me. Its a little cramped in there and its best to disconnect the battery as your right near the alternators power wire. Some bits can be tricky but its not as bad as some other cars thats for sure. Just take your time. If you think its tight do it back up and try not to snap the old studs off.

A good idea is to replace the nuts with copper flashed exhaust nuts as they are softer and take the heat better and will never ruin studs. I use them on everything hot and currently never had an issue thus far thankfully
I've watched your Videos before actually the oil pan one cuz I am also `doing that too.
 
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