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Resolved Special tools for front case seals, balance shafts

Mech Addict

Supporting Member
1,154
545
Jun 9, 2019
Jackson, Wyoming
So I've been looking through the FSM at the special tools recommended for various seals on the front case, cam seals, and balance shaft bearings. I'm not too worried about finding a seal driver for each of those seals, as there is often a way to modify a socket or piece of pvc pipe or fittings to do those tasks. It hardly ever needs to be hard steel.

There are some slightly conical "plugs" that fit over the cam and crank ends that appear to widen the seal lips enough to slide onto the associated cam/crank surface. I already picked up one for the cams on ebay, because it was pretty cheap (actually listed for a KIA, but with the same tool #). Should I see about the one for the crank, or will a somewhat ably handed semi-hack such as myself be able to coax the new crank seal around the crank end w/o harming it?

Then there are a number of plates, pullers, and various adaptors for removing and reinstalling balance shaft bearings. All told that setup would cost $100's on top of the new bearings. Because of that, I'm inclined to leave the shafts where they are and not mess with removing them or the bearings. Getting the right micrometers and bore gauges seems equally if not more expensive, although they would at least serve future uses. The oil leaks are my main focus, and my impression of ballance shaft failures is that the balance belt is mostly the culprit, not bad bearings. While those things do spin with intentional unequal loading, their pressure-lubed bearings probably don't see anything like the uneven loading of crank and rod bearings, which can last well over 100k mi in stock form.

Any other tricks or suggestions are welcome.
 

steve

DSM Wiseman
15,001
1,802
Feb 3, 2002
Boulder, Colorado
I don't know how bad corrosion is in Wyoming but back in the rust belt the rear mounts on the LCA's were eaten away long before the ball joints got sloppy. Can't say the same for the ARB links.

I discovered the LCA rear mount tracking down the reason why the front end would vibrate every time I braked, went to change the bushing and there wasn't much there besides rust flakes.
 

Mech Addict

Supporting Member
1,154
545
Jun 9, 2019
Jackson, Wyoming
You mean the big steel pin on the end? Mine had some rust, but not too bad. I did a Carfax search on my car, and learned it was originally from Texas, and then Florida, where I bought it. Roughly half the time in each. Not much rust on the car in general, save for the inside of the gas tank, which I've already dealt with. I had actually been curious on determining/ verifying the milage on my car, after I learned first-hand how easy it is to swap out the gauge cluster, odometer included. The Carfax report only listed the milage of the original sale, as the various jurisdictions after that did not require it be listed for a 10yo+ car. My car apparently sat on the dealer's lot for about a year, likely because of the leather seats and full options (power everything, car alarm, although no abs or sunroof, for which I'm thankful). While the factory price of these cars now seems like a steal, compared to mustangs and camaros of the day, not really. Plus, and AWD car in Texas.....
Hardly any rust here in DryOming. We have so much winter they don't bother using salt. Just let the snow pack take over and keep it plowed down to a few inches. On my wife's RAV4 we run snow tires year-round.
 

DSSA

Supporting Vendor
655
485
Jul 26, 2002
Hatfield, Pennsylvania
That's a great solution, Josh. When I was a bus mechanic we used to keep old wheel bearing races to use as a driver that we could hammer on to install a new race. The ultimate in repurpose worn parts.

I put in new ones already, so that's not the issue on my car. I still have the original MB struts, and I've had other vehicles where something in the strut actually made noise over bumps. It's on my list to replace, though honestly, the car handles pretty well for 30yo struts. I'm 90%+ confident that it is the front-pass. corner. Ball joints are feeling not too stiff anymore, and under $50 for the pair. If the clunk remains, then struts and mounts are next. Ultimately I may have to do the subframe, but so much more involved. :barf:
Same.

A lot of my "press tools" are simply leftover parts.
 

pauleyman

DSM Wiseman
8,434
2,954
Nov 19, 2011
oklahoma city, Oklahoma
Same.

A lot of my "press tools" are simply leftover parts.
I'll add to this. Run the edge through the bench grinder so the diameter is slightly smaller. When you press a bearing race the "tool" doesn't get stuck. Been pressing races like this for 20 years now.
Junk center diff top has proved useful often also. 😁
 
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Mech Addict

Supporting Member
1,154
545
Jun 9, 2019
Jackson, Wyoming
So I know I marked this "resolved", but thought I'd share a bit of new info. I tried to order the factory tool for the "castle plug", which is now done through Bosch Automotive Service Solutions. The part number is MD998162-01. While the price is only $37, it is back-ordered until August. That's not going to fit my schedule, so looks like I'll try to make my own. I was not opposed to that in the first place, but trying to balance the time = money equation led me the purchase route. Kind of maddening that they come up with this odd-ball part and special tool when it seems the right hex head, or even an inset "allen" head would have made sense. I guess it has to do with the way car companies make decisions to go from development into production. Some bean counter somewhere shave's 0.34 cents off the car and we get to deal with the consequences thereafter. :hmm:
 

luv2rallye

DSM Wiseman
8,441
1,202
Jun 7, 2003
Minneapolis, Minnesota
That castle plug has such thin and wierd teeth that you can easily ruin it trying to get it off without tool MD998162-01 shown in post 29 (which has the correct fitting teeth needed). And using screwdrivers just keep sliding off (teeth aren't thick enough to get a solid grip on). You really need the special socket to apply force to all the teeth at the same time. I have one and ordered it here: https://mitsubishi.service-solutions.com/Detail/15/MD998162-01-PLUG-WRENCH

Of course if you're removing the front case on an engine on a stand you won't have to remove it. See at 10:40 here:
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1990TSIAWDTALON

Moderator
9,877
5,753
Nov 14, 2013
Independence, Kansas
I stopped at my pawn shop to grab 2 or 3 1 1/8 sockets to fab up for you guys and he was out of anything bigger than a sparkplug socket. Sorry. It was going to be a surprise but now it's a let down.
 

Mech Addict

Supporting Member
1,154
545
Jun 9, 2019
Jackson, Wyoming
That castle plug has such thin and wierd teeth that you can easily ruin it trying to get it off without tool MD998162-01 shown in post 29 (which has the correct fitting teeth needed). I have one and ordered it here: https://mitsubishi.service-solutions.com/Detail/15/MD998162-01-PLUG-WRENCH

Of course if you're removing the front case on an engine on a stand you won't have to remove it. See at 10:40 here:
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Yes, they are actually now owned by Bosch, if you dig around on that website a bit. I called to order one but back-ordered until August.

I stopped at my pawn shop to grab 2 or 3 1 1/8 sockets to fab up for you guys and he was out of anything bigger than a sparkplug socket. Sorry. It was going to be a surprise but now it's a let down.
Hey that’s super considerate of you! I’m going to give it a shot myself.
Temptingly, a new plug and can be had for about $18, so I’m not above butchering the one on the car to get it out, and just get a new one. That’s not normally my style, but one never can tell exactly how it will all go down in the garage. :thumb:
 

luv2rallye

DSM Wiseman
8,441
1,202
Jun 7, 2003
Minneapolis, Minnesota
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Mech Addict

Supporting Member
1,154
545
Jun 9, 2019
Jackson, Wyoming
Thanks for the offer. I might take you up on it if mine doesn’t work out. I’m now in for $14.xx on a socket to modify. It’s a GearWrench impact 1” hex. OD is shade under 1-1/2”. Interior corner to corner is 1-1/8”. My measurements of the castle plug would suggest the ideal would be 1-7/16 OD, and 1-1/4” ID. Makes sense that a chrome version would be thinner walled, hence a 1-1/8” socket to start with. I test fit over the plug, and it is just about right, maybe just need to shave a hair off the outer. I’ll wait until I’ve ground all the notches for that.

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luv2rallye

DSM Wiseman
8,441
1,202
Jun 7, 2003
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Here's a good pic of the teeth end of the real tool MD998162-01. As you can see the teeth are only half the width of the socket wall (wall = 0.16" thick, teeth = 0.07" thick) which is what makes it work so nice. Teeth are 0.29" wide and have a 0.40" space between them. Not that it matters but the socket is 2" long and a 3/8" drive. Socket OD is 1.44" and distance from inside of tooth to the inside of tooth straight across is 1.29".

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Mech Addict

Supporting Member
1,154
545
Jun 9, 2019
Jackson, Wyoming
Thanks for the dims. I started out with an angle grinder, but it was hard to control. Now I’m using a 14” mill bastard file. At some point I will need to take a little off the OD, but it started out pretty close. The ID is going to take a lot more removal because it started out 1.125”. I’ll try a dremel with carbide cutter. At least filing I can do over some newspapers in my kitchen. The garage is about 15 deg F.

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luv2rallye

DSM Wiseman
8,441
1,202
Jun 7, 2003
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Note the teeth/notches on the plug are SO shallow that the tool will tend to pop off (and using 2 screwdrivers is completely hopeless because of this). I had to force holding even the proper tool on with a crowbar to keep it from slipping off the plug notches while turning. However it worked great then. [Even the FSM shows holding this special tool on with another special tool MD998783 (which of course is not available anywhere).] The FSM also says to hit the plug head with a hammer 2-3 times to loosen it which I found helps (couldn't get it loose without hitting it).
 

Mech Addict

Supporting Member
1,154
545
Jun 9, 2019
Jackson, Wyoming
Got it! I didn’t have a spare plug to use for a guide, so I used actual Silly Putty to make an impression of it on the car. Lots of filing work and it fits very snug. Mine came out without much effort. I did tap it with a hammer first, as some suggested. Didn’t need to push it against with a prybar though. I may have been able to just use a drift on the teeth, but didn’t want to risk damage. Plus, it sort of became a challenge beyond simply the next step. That said, I would have purchased one if it was in stock. Thanks for everyone’s help and encouragement.

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19Eclipse90

DSM Wiseman
5,305
1,173
Sep 29, 2003
OKC, Oklahoma
3D Printed Car Parts

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This is what I created and used as a drawing template for my 2-tooth tool. In this case, the tooth width (.304-.314 inches) is much less critical than the space between opposing teeth (1.228-1.233 inches). The teeth on my tool measure about 0.280 inches wide. The space between opposing teeth is pretty dead nuts at 1.230 inches.

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luv2rallye

DSM Wiseman
8,441
1,202
Jun 7, 2003
Minneapolis, Minnesota
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