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My 3rd attempt at a 97 DSM

007jimmy

Proven Member
1,613
185
Feb 27, 2012
Levittown, Pennsylvania
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Was able to get some more work done finally. Just a few more little things to button up before first start up!
 

007jimmy

Proven Member
1,613
185
Feb 27, 2012
Levittown, Pennsylvania
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Installed a 1g aluminum radiator along with some 1g silicone hoses. I prefer the top hose being away from the heat. The dual 12" slim fans were knockoffs but performance remains to be seen. Yea yea I know.... Used stock plugs off of junkyard 420a fans to make the harness plug and play so no hacking my harness.
 
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007jimmy

Proven Member
1,613
185
Feb 27, 2012
Levittown, Pennsylvania
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Slacking on the updates as I'm currently searching for a new home. But the motor is up and running! Not even lifter tick at startup. Break in period is over and now it's time to install bigger injectors and tune it. Was running 450s and stock boost/ECU map for my initial break in. 12psi max. Can't wait for her to open up and breathe.
 

007jimmy

Proven Member
1,613
185
Feb 27, 2012
Levittown, Pennsylvania
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Picked up some more stuff for the future which is a new CC breather and catch can setup along with some larger FIC 1150 injectors. Also started to get rid of anything that's corroded for a cleaner look. This may take awhile
 
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007jimmy

Proven Member
1,613
185
Feb 27, 2012
Levittown, Pennsylvania
What is up with that bumper cut job to fit around the IC?
Well because I didn't like the little walls that only went some of the way up the bumper opening. I cut out the black portion and a little more which left the gap of the inner walls at the top. Just my preference.
 

007jimmy

Proven Member
1,613
185
Feb 27, 2012
Levittown, Pennsylvania
Out of the game for awhile because I was devastated when I lost the motor in less then 5k miles in early 2019. Some lessons were learned and a $hit ton of money was wasted. Here is what took out the motor. Hard to see but the stub shaft hole was wasted when the grade 10 bolt fell off the stub shaft. Yes I know it’s the wrong style shaft let alone no loctite on the bolt, without the oil groove but I never open the case up when I purchased the fully built block. It was fresh from the machine shop with no run time and everything else was gone over with quality parts so I ASSumed the stub was properly done. I paid the price bad for not looking...
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007jimmy

Proven Member
1,613
185
Feb 27, 2012
Levittown, Pennsylvania
Progress....
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Built 6 bolt:
Torque plate honed
Weisco HD 10:0-1 pistons
Eagle rods
Eagle crank
Blocked oil squirters
Balance shaft elimination
OEM water pump
1g NT water pipe
1990 ported OFH w/smaller oil pressure relief spring
Arp L19 studs
New Spectra 6 bolt oil pan
Evo spec overdrive water pump pulley
OEM timing accessories
Kiggly crank trigger kit
Fluidampr crank pulley
Jay Racing alternator relocation kit modified for 97-99 half shaft
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PROPER oil pump build this time. All brand new

OEM 6 bolt front case
OEM 6 bolt Straight cut gears
OEM 2g oil strainer
OEM balance shaft delete plug
Mitsu stub WITH THE OIL GROOVE!!!!
 
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007jimmy

Proven Member
1,613
185
Feb 27, 2012
Levittown, Pennsylvania
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Here are some photos of the modification needed to run the Jay Racing alternator relocation kit on a 2gb eclipse/talon. I had no idea that it needed modifications to fit a 2gb dsm. It’s only advertised as 2g only. I contacted Jay via Facebook messenger and he told me that I needed to drill and tap a hole for the 2gb style half shaft. Luckily I work in a small machine shop so this wasn’t really a issue.
The AC bracket acts as a spacer so I cut it down and took some measurements. First I needed to drill and tap a hole for the one of the half shaft bolts. I cut the bracket down small enough to overlay it on the Jays bracket to pick up the hole positions.

The stock half shaft bolt hole casting had a thickness of .785” and the Jays Racing bracket was only .400” thick so a .385” spacer was needed to fill the gap. I couldn’t find much other information other then a few people simply said drill and tap a hole. So hopefully this can help someone if they are in a similar situation.
 

007jimmy

Proven Member
1,613
185
Feb 27, 2012
Levittown, Pennsylvania
Nice build! Did you rtv your oil pan on yet? Took me a while to get mine to quit leaking. Had to use a felpro paper gasket.
Yes I did. I must say using a brand new pan was nice, so damn clean and a straight flange :D . I’ve resealed OEM pans before but the prying/using a mallet to flatten the flange makes less room for error. When I sealed the pan this time I hand tightened the bolts with a nut driver and then let it sit for 48hrs to cure the RTV. I then went and tightened each bolt some more which allows for the RTV to squish more hopefully sealing everything. This method hasn’t failed me yet but that remains to be seen for this particular block.

EDIT: I’ve never personally used paper or cork gaskets on a DSM oil pan. Seen many threads where it’s hit or miss. Nonetheless it came factory with Mitsubond (RTV) so that’s the way I prefer to install the oil pan.
 
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007jimmy

Proven Member
1,613
185
Feb 27, 2012
Levittown, Pennsylvania
Cylinder head time....
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Ported 1g 7 bolt head

Ferrea Competition Plus valves +1mm
Ferrea valve keepers
Kiggly beehive springs w/Ti retainers
Kiggly HLA
EVO 8-9 rockers
3g lifters
GSC billet S2 cams
GSC valve seals
GSC bronze valve guides
Oil port mod
EGR port tapped and plugged
Head stud holes opened up for 6 bolt head studs
AEM Tru-time cam gears W/ARP bolts
Gates racing timing belt
ARP SS exhaust manifold studs
Fel-Pro perma-torque head gasket
1g NT thermostat housing
 
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007jimmy

Proven Member
1,613
185
Feb 27, 2012
Levittown, Pennsylvania
Timing cover modifications and install:

I’m not the first to do this but I really dislike the 1 piece 1g 6 bolt timing cover. I originally cut the 6 bolt cover into 2 pieces but I really didn’t like the giant saw line that went across the cover. So I purchased a brand new 2g middle timing cover. Overlapped the 2g cover on top of the 6 bolt cover and started trimming the bottom cover slowly until I crept up to the proper size. The 2g cover slightly overlaps the lower cover when installed so I was trying to achieve that. It took about 5 times of installing cutting then reinstalling to get it correct. Now I feel it will be easier to service this area when needed and looks factory.
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Picture of the upper timing covers. 2g is the bottom.
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Fully installed 6 bolt/2g timing covers and a clear HKS cam gear cover. I had to notch the clear cover because the ARP cam gear bolts are too big.
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Alternator relocation kit installed. The 2g motor mount bracket had to be trimmed for clearance of the accessory belt.
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Frontline Fab dipstick handle and powdercoated NT 1g water pipe.
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Powdercoated 1g NT thermostat housing with the rear FIAV port welded closed. OEM thermostat and all SS hardware.
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Im choosing to do the heater core bypass so I needed to run the coolant lines correct or there will be no proper flow through the system. So I purchased a Dayco c87617 hose from Amazon and it fit perfectly after trimming the large water pipe tube that runs to the firewall. This hose gives it that OEM cleaner look. I do not take credit for this bypass mod. Here is the link to the thread where I got the information from if anyone is interested in doing this as well:
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007jimmy

Proven Member
1,613
185
Feb 27, 2012
Levittown, Pennsylvania
Since the motor is basically complete I’d figure I would start to replace the old stock suspension with some fresh parts along will doing some cleaning/rust prevention on the body.
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I purchased the OEM front knuckle/LCA/compression arm kit from extremepsi. It’s actually cheaper to buy the kit then purchase these parts separately for some reason. Since I have Evo 9 brembo calipers on the front I decided to modify the knuckles so the calipers can face upwards like stock. The can clock up or down but it’s just a matter of preference and there is nothing to gain either way. Some pictures of the work being done on the knuckles:
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Brand new Moog front hubs installed. I also purchased Moog heavy duty front sway bar links ( version with the grease fitting )
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When I went to remove the old suspension parts I quickly realized that the rust was kicking my ass. First the passenger axle was seized in the hub. I destroyed it trying everything I could to get it out. So I gave up and decided to remove the axle/hub/original knuckle and scrap them.
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Now the drivers side was going smoothly until I tried to remove the LCA. The bolt seized in the bushing and spun inside the casting. Had to purchase a sawzall to cut the bolt out.
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2 years ago I purchased a set of ST front and rear sway bars. It was finally time to install the front bar since everything was removed. The front bar is adjustable but I may just leave thesetup in the middle setting until I drive the car for a bit. I unfortunately don’t have a side by side picture. They are both roughly the same diameter though.
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With all the axles removed li installed the IPT 6 bolt auto spacer/seal kit. It spaces the axle seal out more so the half shaft can seal better. I didn’t have any leaks without the kit but you can definitely tell that the seal was riding right next to the very edge of the machine polished area. I also replaced the passenger side axle seal as well for good measure.
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I rebuilt the upper control arms with new ball joints and prothane bushings along with a new coat of paint. The prothane kit came with bushings for the LCAs as well so I installed them too.
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When everything was off I power washed and degreased the front wheel wells and gave it a coat of primer then rubberized undercoating. This car is not a daily so I’m not worried about rain or snow anymore.
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I don’t plan on installing the rest of the front suspension until I undercoat the rest for the car. I need to do some cleaning and rust repair first. I just pulled the rear subframe and suspension so that update will be coming soon. Tons of new aftermarket parts and OEM will be installed finally.
 
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007jimmy

Proven Member
1,613
185
Feb 27, 2012
Levittown, Pennsylvania
With the rear subframe assembly pulled I can now see if there is anything else wrong. The suspension was all original (build date 6/96) and it’s a northern car so the odds were against me and I assumed the rear was just as bad as the front. I was most worried about the rear axles seizing in the hubs because there are no cheaper real axle replacements for the AWD 2g. Luckily they came out with some heat and a 5lb sledge/wood! The toe adjustment arms were a different story....
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After both toe arms were chopped out I checked out the bare subframe to see how bad the rust is. Looks pretty bad but it’s all mostly surface rust which I was glad to see.
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Since I have gone this far with this part of the process I decided to remove all of the stock rubber bushings in the subframe. To remove the subframe to frame bushings I used a 2-1/8 hole saw to gut the 4 outer bushings. A propane torch and a wire wheel took car of the very small amount of rubber left over. I purchased the torque solutions subframe bushings so the metal ring inside stays. As for the rear diff bushings I drilled multiple holes around the outer rubber ring and knocked out the rubber. I needed to use the sawzall to remove the metal bushing ring afterwards. Glad I only have to do this once because it definitely was an interesting experience....
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I took the 3rd rear diff bushing to work to remove the stock rubber bushing. Same method as above just easier to work with.

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With the torque solutions bushings you need a few pieces from the stock rubber bushing setup. You need the center metal ring and the lower hat. Both sets of those pieces need to have all of the rubber completely removed to use with the new poly bushings. For the center ring I used a arbor press to press out the center ring and a small lathe to clean up the rest of the parts.
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I used 80 grit then 400 for a smooth finish
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For the lower hats I will be removing the rubber by fire. I haven’t done this process yet but I can’t seem to find another way to remove the stock rubber. I will add a picture once done.

Now for the good stuff :D
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All Volk rear arms and solid diff bushings. So damn sexy... Next update soon
 

007jimmy

Proven Member
1,613
185
Feb 27, 2012
Levittown, Pennsylvania
Now with the subframe wire wheeled and power washed I used Loctite rust inhibitor on every place I could access with a paint brush to help prevent any further corrosion. It was also time to install the volk solid diff bushings. A bit of a pain in the ass without a press bit I was able to manage with a mallet/wood along and a threaded rod with washers/nuts on each end to squeeze the bushings in.
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Now onto the rear differential. The cast housing was a rusty mess so I spent quite a bit of time chiseling the flakes off and wire wheeling everything. Since I was changing the axle seals I left everything sealed so I didn’t get any rust/dirt into the case.

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Once I got the outer case as clean as I could get I pulled the axles so I could wire wheel the rust around the cups. Once the axles were out of the way the case is way easier to maneuver around. I wanted to check how the inside was doing and to make sure I caught any potential issues. Taking the cover off seemed simple enough but the rust had other plans. Snapped a bolt off while removing them so I had to spend a few minutes to remove the stud that was left. Wasn’t too bad, just annoying...
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From there I spun the diff by hand manually to check for any binding/any potential problem. The hand check passed so I cleaned out the old fluid using mineral spirits. Pulled both the saddles and popped out the VC unit. Inspected that for damage/wear along with the bearings. No scoring or heat marks were found. I left the companion flange alone for now. I figured that I would take it off and reset the backlash only if I found it was out of spec on reassembly.
It is now time for some POR15!
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It’s my first time using this and it’s really not that bad to use overall. It can be messy but I watched a few video pointers on how to handle this stuff. I painted the case (taped off everything I didn’t want covered). I used ear plugs for the bolt holes. You don’t want this stuff in any of the threaded holes!! Sandblasted the diff cover and repainted it chrome. After the POR15 dried I reassembled the VC assembly and torqued the saddle bolts to spec. I wish I got a picture of this but I used a paint marker to color the teeth. I spun the pinion flange to spin the diff assembly. I was checking to see where the teeth ride on the gears. It was still within the service manual specs so I left it alone. Definitely was happy to see that. I never have adjusted a pinion on a diff before but I’m sure I could figure it out. The service manual is definitely a life saver for me regardless though!
I also added new:
OEM axle seals
OEM diff breather
OEM fill plug
OEM magnetic drain plug
G10 zinc bolts/washers since mine were rusted and one snapped. this thing looks brand new just about
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After the diff was finished I moved onto using the POR15 on the rear subframe and E-brake assembly plate for added corrosion protection as mine both needed so good wire wheel action to clean them up. I did cover the pretty aluminum volk bushings but most people don’t care to look under the car anyway.
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Im waiting on my set of torque solutions rear subframe bushings to come in the mail then the subframe will be complete. Along with the volk rear arms I will be adding a ST rear sway bar. I know it’s not a popular choice due to the exhaust has to be rerouted and it’s no bigger then stock (19mm) but for me personally that won’t be a issue due to the side exit exhaust I will be running.
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Drive shaft rebuild is next!
 

007jimmy

Proven Member
1,613
185
Feb 27, 2012
Levittown, Pennsylvania
Very nice work!
Thank you!!


I’m currently waiting for my order from STM which is the driveshaft conical washers (2) and a set of new driveshaft to rear diff bolt/nut set along with a 27mm socket for the carrier bearing nuts. So in the meantime I removed all of the stock rubber bushings and I cleaned/ lightly sandblasted the rear knuckles. I decided not to paint them with regular paint and went with some more POR15 since I have plenty left. The knuckles came out looking brand new! Finished painting the rear emergency brake backing plates too.
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Time for some poly bushings!
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For some reason I couldn’t find just the full rear knuckle set by itself. Since I’ll be running all rear volk arms I don’t need the full rear suspension set. I did have to buy 2 separate sets one for the upper bushings and one for the lower bushings. Apparently the top knuckle bushings are a different part number then the bottom set. I measured bot sets and they are just slightly different although to the naked eye they appear to be the same size. Even the numbers on the moldings are different between the sets (upper bushing set numbers are molded in “64187” and the lower set has “64185” molded in). Not sure why prothane doesn’t sell just a complete rear knuckle set. Maybe they do and I couldn’t find it! Anyways, here are the part numbers for reference.
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Next on the list are the rear upper control arms. My stock set was very crusty looking so I purchased a set of Moog replacements. There are quite a bit of options for the rear UCAs but most don’t have a bottom plate welded on the bottom for added strength. I also added prothane bushings for rear arms as well. I was told the rear stock rubber bushings on the UCAs is the same size as the front rubber bushings on the UCAs so I purchased another set of front control arm prothane bushings. The prothane set fit but the brackets that bolt to the arms had to be spread open a tad to slip over larger prothane bushings. A rubber mallet made quick work of that. Here are a set of OEM arms and the Moog replacements.
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Here is a picture of the underside of the arms showing the welded plates I mentioned earlier. Some sets do not have these plates and are essentially “open”
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007jimmy

Proven Member
1,613
185
Feb 27, 2012
Levittown, Pennsylvania
I finally was able to disassemble the driveshaft and check it out. The U-joints didn’t feel too sloppy but that doesn’t matter be it’ll all be replaced. Both carrier bearing seals were shot and pretty dry. The lobro joint was still sealed and the grease was clean on the inside which I hope is a good sign. Here is the aftermath, which took only less then 2 hours. I was expecting more and this is my first time being exposed to this. It’s not really bad! I’ll be disassembling and cleaning the lobro along with sandblasting and coating the driveshaft with POR15.
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When I pulled the drivers side e-brake cable out of the backing plate I destroyed it (rust welded itself in e bore) I purchased and installed new aftermarket e-brake cables from rockauto. I would have went OEM but the one side is discontinued from Mitsu.
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My torque solutions rear subframe bushings came. They were very easy to install even with the bolt/washer setup I made. Much nicer then the 25 year old cracked/hard OEM bushings.
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007jimmy

Proven Member
1,613
185
Feb 27, 2012
Levittown, Pennsylvania
After you install one axis of the u joint, make sure it’s smooth. I had a few bad needle bearings in one brand new oe u joint. Had to replace them from one I had pulled off.
Thank you for the heads up. I have 1 yoke kit and 2 OEM U-joints. I’ve never had a problem with Mitsu stuff but that doesn’t mean it can’t happen. Hopefully I’ll be good to go!
 

DogWhistle

Supporting VIP
755
317
Sep 13, 2012
St. Paul, Minnesota
Great job on the build. Thanks for the pictures and explanations. We’ll check out those Torque Solutions bushings.
 

007jimmy

Proven Member
1,613
185
Feb 27, 2012
Levittown, Pennsylvania
Great job on the build. Thanks for the pictures and explanations. We’ll check out those Torque Solutions bushings.
Thank you so much! It’s a bit of a job to pull the rear subframe and remove the old bushings. I spent more time cleaning/prepping/coating the subframe then anything else but other than that it wasn’t a bad job to tackle. Especially for my first time and doing it by myself.

Just a update on the driveshaft. I was able to sandblast and prep all the pieces for a coat of por15. I only sandblasted the 3 shaft pieces and the smaller parts I used a wire brush and carb cleaner. I’m starting to enjoy putting on the por15 as it makes everything look like new and will hold up great under the car.
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Lobro is now disassembled and clean. No damage was found and it’s now ready for reassembly. All the parts are marked so it will go back together the way it came from the factory.
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007jimmy

Proven Member
1,613
185
Feb 27, 2012
Levittown, Pennsylvania
While the driveshaft is out I was able to power wash and wire wheel the underside of the car. While under there I found a few rust holes that needed attention. Mostly near the inner rear wheel wells on both sides. It didn’t look too bad until I started poking with a screwdriver. The holes definitely doubled in size :barf:. I used a dremel cut off wheel and cut it all out. To patch it up I used the fiberglass bondo kit (fiberglass cloth and resin) to repair a hole underneath and for the smaller holes I used the fiberglass bondo putty with the metal mesh. It’s not perfect but it’s underneath the car and the rot is all cut out and gone.I removed the gas tank shield because that was rotted through as well not to mention 3 of the 4 bolts snapped off....I taped off everything I didn’t want undercoating on and sprayed the whole underneath. I tried to be as thorough as possible. Took a full 7 cans for what I can say good coverage. Rustoleum undercoating is the brand. Sorry for the crappy pictures but I’m working on my back in the driveway:coy:.
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Next project is my power steering rack. I just had the lines looped at the rack and drove it like that for months. I’m not a small guy so driving like that wasn’t a problem. Even though I can drive it like that doesn’t make it right so I purchased a custom manual 2g rack from NDDmotorsports. Here is a link to what I purchased:


If you are more curious about it here is a video of the install of the manual rack. I will use this video as a guide once I receive mine (few week lead time).

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Since I have no front suspension on it’s a perfect time to drop the stock 2g power steering rack.
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The inner tie rod boots are cut off because I noticed one side was a little bit wet looking. When I cut the passenger side boot open it was full of power steering fluid! The other side was fine. So I needed a new rack anyway it looks like. If you watched the video above you need to remove your stock steering joint and send it to NDD for a core. The video shows a slide hammer being used and I didn’t have one. In the comments there is a post stating that there is plastic injected into the joint so it can collapse during an accident. It says to drill out the plastic and the joint will separate easier. Both sides need to be drilled. Here is a picture of what I mean:
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I did remove the front ST sway bar and took a picture of it compared to stock since I previously didn’t snap a picture. Looks very similar except for the 3 adjustments points on the ST bar.
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Since the undercoating was done I can’t find myself to bolt on rusty brackets so I sandblasted the e-brake cable brackets (6 total), coated with por15 and used SS hardware w/anti-seize to bolt them in. Nobody will ever see it but it’s better then corroded parts.
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My last shipment of parts for the driveshaft came from STM so a full OEM rebuild can be done. It sucks that a few of these parts are now discontinued :|.
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HAPPY HOLIDAYS EVERYONE!!!
 
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