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How to Install AEM UEGO Wideband in 2G Turbo in place of stock O2 Sensor

The purpose of this install guide is to install AEM's UEGO Wideband kit into a turbo 2G eclipse in place of the stock O2 sensor without using some kind of narrowband emulation like DSMlink. There are a number of ways to install the gauge on DSMtuners but there wasn't one that focused on installing it in the stock front O2 sensor standalone. I did much research on this before and the main benefit of this is:
- You don't need to weld an O2 sensor bung into your exhaust
- The front O2 sensor position is a good place to install the Wideband sensor
- You get the advantages of having a quicker reacting and more accurate O2 sensor for you ECU
- You don't need to add an O2 sensor to your car your merely replacing one.
- You get a wideband gauge/sensor to accurately and safely monitor your AFRs
- You DO NOT need some fancy software like DSMlink to emulate a 0V-1V narrowband signal for your ECU as the UEGO has the capability of doing that itself with a turn of a screw.

UPDATE:
Some issues with running this setup have been brought to my attention:
- Having the WBo2 in the O2 housing will reduce its life
- The NB output of the UEGO to the ECU runs kind of funky because it doesn't cycle correctly.
- The UEGO should be grounded to the ECU. There have been some issues with properly grounding the UEGO. I chose to use the cigarette lighter ground if I have issues later I may change it to the O2 sensor ground instead.
*I pretty much installed the setup so I can't say first hand but there are a handful of people that either are having problems with this setup or having been running it no problem for a while. I will make update reports to this article as I drive the car more at the bottom of the post. I did lots of research on DSMtuners before I did this and like I said some are good and some are bad but there's not a whole lot of comments/posts out there to really justify if it is good or bad in my opinion until I have observed it first hand. I don't race my car I use it mainly for commuting so we'll see how it is for normal driving.

I will cover the basics of the install and wiring and how I myself installed the gauge into my 1998 Eclipse GST. How and where you wish to install the gauge is entirely up to you. I installed it where I had an Autometer AFR gauge in an autometer bezel pod setup installed before so the installation was pretty simple for me as I had places to splice it into already mapped out. I would also like to point out that when I wire stuff I always solder the wires in because its the best connection and looks the best. What I've been doing is cutting some of the jacket off the wire I'm splicing, wrap the wire around this area and solder it on. Then put electrical tape around it and put a zip tie so the tape doesn't come off. If you want to use those plastic vampire taps that's your preference looks horrible to me and you never know they might pop off...

Here is basically how your UEGO kit will come with: The box, the sensor harness, the vehicle harness, sensor itself, the gauge, the manual, and some faces and different bezel to change how looks to suite your tastes.
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BEFORE you start installing this thing you will want to set the gauge to P04 mode. This mode tells the gauge to convert the wideband signal to a narrowband signal our ECUs are programmed to use. You want to do this before so you don't accidentally start your car up and the UEGO is sending 0-5V signal to your ECU which may murder your ECU.


So first take out:
The Gauge
Vehicle Harness (its the one with the 4 wires coming out of it)

For this step you will need:
A Jeweler's Flathead Screwdriver
Wirestrippers or a sharp knife
Alligator wires/ Test Leads
A 12V battery

Now examine this diagram and plug the harness into your gauge where it says 4pin on the diagram. It is difficult to plug in (Its kind of cheaply made in my opinion), you kind of have to maneuver it into the gauge and plug it in. Carefully plug it in taking care not to bend or break the pins.
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Next strip the BLACK and RED wires on the harness long enough to clip the leads to. Then connect the RED wire to your 12V battery's +/red side and the BLACK wire to your 12V battery's -/Black side. I used my Harbor Freight portable jump starter for this step pictured below. Also I did it when I did it I plugged in the O2 sensor harness and sensor. If you do this put your sensor someplace where it won't burn you, it gets hot. If you don't have a portable 12V battery just plug it to your car battery.
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Now when you plug it in it will go through a booting sequence and flash all sorts of numbers like this:
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What you are concerned with is anything that has a P on it like this:
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Now look at this diagram:
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Then look at the back of the gauge here:
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Take your screwdriver and turn the knob in the direction that P4 is in. So if your gauge now says P0 (if its never been in installed I'm assuming) you will want to rotate the knob CLOCKWISE until the display reads P04 like in the picture above. It should tell you what mode you are in as you turn the knob.

Now when you've done this disconnect the power and fire it up again to go through the bootsequence again and verify you are in P04 mode. Then your done with the gauge setup. I know its kinda dumb how they just don't put the labels onto the gauge itself, but like I said its kinda cheaply made so we have to do it this way which is so confusing, but that's why you have this guide.

You can do the rest of the steps in any order you wish pretty much but I suggest the following...

Now time take your driver's side kick panel out to gain access to the ECU and wiring.
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Take you O2 sensor harness pictured here:
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Now this part is probably the HARDEST part of the whole install. Because you have to fish this BIG ass wiring harness through the firewall somewhere. The worse part is that it is best (HIGHLY RECOMMENDED) that you run it from the engine bay to the inside of the car because from the inside (where its easiest) you'll have to run that big fat O2 sensor connector through the firewall.

Here is what I did. I decided to fish it through the steering boot because I have a vacuum line for my boost gauge going through there already.
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I enlarged the hole a bit and then disconnected some vacuum lines in that area and moved some hoses around so I can stick my arm all the way to the steering boot from the engine bay and get the connector through the boot. It was difficult and took a while but I manage to get it. If you have big arms and hands this can be tough.
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Tada and its through!
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Next start running the harness to your O2 sensor. I chose to leave all the extra slack inside of the car instead of in the engine bay because the engine bay is crowded enough as it is. I went along the AC line on the timing belt side to the O2 sensor instead of going the stock O2 sensor route. Just make sure you ziptie the wire to a hose or something so the timing belt or accessory belts don't contact it.
 
Last edited:

HadesOmega

20+ Year Contributor
640
10
Aug 5, 2002
408, California
Now its time to install the wideband O2 sensor. You'll need these tools:
Anti Seize Compound
Electrical tape
A O2 sensor socket (I bought this crows foot one from Harbor Freight worked great)
Ratchet/sockets
Breaker Bar (you'll probably need it because the stock one is probably in there good, hopefully whoever installed it before this used anti-seize compound on it)
A jack/jackstands
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First jack up your car high enough where you can get under the car and to the O2 sensor. I just jacked the drivers side up.
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Next remove your O2 sensor with the socket and breaker bar. It will probably stubborn but that why we have the breaker bar. You may need to loosen your headshield or bend it to get the tool to access the sensor.
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After you loosen it you can use the less awkward ratchet to unscrew it. It takes time be patient you'll probably have to keep on take the socket out so you can get some motion from it.

When you get the sensor out remove it and trace it back to where it is on the harness and unplug it so you can cut a wire. The plug will be somewhere near the thermostat housing. Now we are going to cut the O2 sensor signal wire so there is no more signal coming from the stock narrowband sensor so the two sensors don't conflict. But we need to leave the rest connected so it can still run the heater circuit and not give us a check engine light. There are a few ways around this but this is the simplest.

Now on the SENSOR side cut the BLUE wire. It maybe different on some aftermarket sensord so first confirm you have the right wire. on the harness side the O2 signal wire is the WHITE wire. So match up the WHITE wire on the harness side to the wire its coming out on the SENSOR side. In my case it was the BLUE wire and cut it. We cut the sensor wire and not the harness wire so if we want to go back to the stock setup its just a matter of installed a new O2 sensor with harness or reconnecting the cut wire.
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Next we are going to wrap the stock O2 sensor in aluminum foil to insulate it and tie it somewhere where it'll be safe but won't start any fires because it gets hot. Here is where I installed it. I ran it to the bottom radiator bracket and zip tied it there.
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Next install your new wideband O2 sensor where your old one was. Make sure you put anti-seize compound on it. and run it to where you have your harness connector at and then tidy up the the wire harness in the engine bay with zipties.
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Now we're all done with the O2 sensor section. Next its time to install the gauge. Find out where you're going to install your gauge and start routing the gauge harness and O2 sensor harness to where it'll be. Be creative. I installed it in the bezel mount I had already.
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These are the 4 familiar wires you used to set the senor output mode earlier. You can install them in any order. Notice where my narrowband gauges disappear into the dash, that's where I'm going to run these through. Also notice how I have put electrical tape around the BLUE wire and ziptied it so it doesn't come off. I just did this because we won't be using it for this install so it doesn't touch anything I covered it.
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Lets start with the O2 sensor signal wire because its probably the hardest to find if you don't have something there already. Now find your ECU its the one with the 4 yellow plugs coming out of it. Your going to want to disconnect the plug that is on the top, sorry its hard to see in this picture, its the one thats already unplugged and you can kinda seet where it was plugged in, in the background.
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Now refer to this diagram I made with the help of turbosax2 colored wiring ECU diagram. The wire you want is the one highlighted in yellow.
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To find it (its sorta hard because its right next to the rear O2 sensor wire and its the same color) pick a reference wire on the diagram. In this case I will chose pin #71 which will be a BLACK wire with a YELLOW STRIPE on it. Find that wire on the plug and count starting with that wire to the 6th pin/wire on that plug. Thats your front O2 sensor wire, tap into this wire. You can see the wire I lifted in the 2nd picture is the one we want. Take the WHITE wire on your harness and splice into the wire your just found.
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Now wire the RED and BLACK wires to a SWITCHED 12V source. The easiest one to get to is the cigarette lighter. The wire coming from the center of the lighter is the + and the one coming off the side is a ground. You can ground it to any ground if you want to.

Now your pretty much done clean everything up and put back the panels you took out and install the gauge and plug in all the harness wires. When you start up your car this is what the gauge should looks like:
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While its warm and idling it should read around 14.7. It doesn't cycle like a narrowband gauge. Now if you want to test if your ECU is seeing the proper signal/voltage hook up a OBD2 datalogger and check the front O2 sensor voltage. It should be 0-1V and should cycle from 0-1V. If you're seeing more than 1V your gauge isn't set right or somethings wrong.

Thanks to:
turbosax2 for his wiring diagram
http://www.dsmtuners.com/forums/articles-tuning-ecu/281763-2g-turbo-ecu-pinout-w-wire-colors.html

and luv2rallye for his O2 sensor wiring info
http://www.dsmtuners.com/forums/articles-electrical-wiring/244376-oxygen-sensor-wiring.html

UPDATE:
Some issues with running this setup have been brought to my attention:
- Having the WBo2 in the O2 housing will reduce its life
- The NB output of the UEGO to the ECU runs kind of funky because it doesn't cycle correctly.
- The UEGO should be grounded to the ECU. There have been some issues with properly grounding the UEGO. I chose to use the cigarette lighter ground if I have issues later I may change it to the O2 sensor ground instead.

*I pretty just much installed the setup so I can't say first hand but there are a handful of people that either are having problems with this setup or having been running it no problem for a while. I will make update reports to this article as I drive the car more at the bottom of the post. I did lots of research on DSMtuners before I did this and like I said some are good and some are bad but there's not a whole lot of comments/posts out there to really justify if it is good or bad in my opinion until I have observed it first hand. I don't race my car I use it mainly for commuting so we'll see how it is for normal driving.

My thoughts after install and and some driving around town:
- WB02 seems to work fine
- Idle is around 14.7, cruise is around 14-15, flutuates a bit.
- Low boost around 10 psi part throttle is around 14-15
- High boost 10+ AFRs fly to 10.0 quickly
- Because of the injectors my idle is a bit wonky, sometimes it will surge at idle and sometimes it will want to stall. It did this before and after install.

My basic setup right now is:
98GST stock ECU flashed with Open Port 2.0
1000cc PTE
Rewired 190 pump
SAFC (doesn't really do anything now)
s(mall)16g turbo
3" catback exhaust
 
Last edited:

HadesOmega

20+ Year Contributor
640
10
Aug 5, 2002
408, California
Well I promised an update. I wound up changing my turbo since then to an e316G. For the most part the car is running good. I'm getting anywhere from 20-28 MPG and AFRs are good. I haven't fixed my idle issue yet though. Driven it about 1000 miles so far.

The best part is today I just passed my biannual smog check and it passed hella good on the sniffer. It idled like shit but still passed. It may have something to do about adding 3 gallons of E85 for insurance but I'd say the wideband is working as it should.

Now I am seriously thinking of wiring it to my turbo timer power because I don't like it running when I'm in Accessory. *UPDATE: I wired it to the ignition on wire so its only on when the the ignition is in the on position. Works better for me because its on when I use my autostart feature on my alarm, before connected to the cigarette lighter it won't power on when my alarm starts the car because it doesn't power the accessories and I'm running without a O2 sensor for that period of time.

Anyway if anyone wants to wire it to their ignition I used the the BLUE BLACK STRIPED WIRE on the ignition harness.
 
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