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Heavy Metal Toxicity

roadsalt

Proven Member
37
10
Sep 11, 2016
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
As car enthusiasts, this is a topic I think we need to touch on more. When I first got into cars, I would get my hands soaked in used oil, rarely used a respirator, soldered without ventilation, and many other dumb things I'm sure. There have been a few times where I have felt sick for a day or two after having my hands covered in grease and oil for hours to the point it soaked in and I couldn't scrub it off. Many of the lubricants, fuels and other products we use on a regular basis contain heavy metals such as molybdenum, phosphorous, manganese, cadmium, chromium, lead, copper, etc... and ALL of them are toxic. Some people may never see ill effects but there are very common genetic mutations which put simply, affect the biological pathways which allow you to clear certain metals from your body. If you aren't clearing them, eventually enough builds up in your tissues where you begin to experience some pretty horrible effects. There is very limited information on how to actually clear some heavy metals from the body, best case scenario it is a journey of years and worst case your genetics don't allow anything to be done.
I'm currently working on a biology degree and I'd love to go into more detail at some point if anyone's interested. Just felt I should post because people don't talk about it enough. Heavy metals are in the air we breathe, the food we eat, the water we drink, and the products we use everyday (even non car people).

If you have experience with heavy metal poisoning or know somebody that did/does, and you feel comfortable posting about it, please do.

take care of yourselves, have a good night
 

Mello

Proven Member
1,260
412
Jul 4, 2003
Albuquerque, New_Mexico
Heavy metals are in the air we breathe, the food we eat, the water we drink, and the products we use everyday (even non car people).
They're in my multi vitamins too.
 
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TK's9d2TSi

Supporting Member
4,644
1,904
Sep 11, 2017
Cincinnati, Ohio
I worked with a guy, still remember his name, Tony Holmes. Master tech for Toyota and had a hunchback, EXACTLY like the hunchback of Norte Dame. He never wore gloves even replacing axle boots. The grease, oil and all the other toxins were imbedded into his hands. Maybe that’s how he got his hunchback :idontknow:
 

lasthope05

Proven Member
1,155
263
Mar 31, 2006
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
I've gotten metal fume fever once, from welding some scrap rotors for a project. Ever since, I pretty much always wear a respirator when welding.
 

roadsalt

Proven Member
37
10
Sep 11, 2016
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
I worked with a guy, still remember his name, Tony Holmes. Master tech for Toyota and had a hunchback, EXACTLY like the hunchback of Norte Dame. He never wore gloves even replacing axle boots. The grease, oil and all the other toxins were imbedded into his hands. Maybe that’s how he got his hunchback :idontknow:
Gotta love old school mechanics. they just don't give a damn ROFL sometimes they get tired of us dumb kids but they're great people. Hard workers maybe they work too hard for their own good. most of them that I have known wound up with some sort of crippling condition by their mid 60s
 

Helaman-99

Proven Member
100
41
May 10, 2019
Spokane Valley, Washington
I love Biology! I'm in Biology 270 in college right now (even though I'm studying Computer Science LOL)

The things our bodies (and consequentially, our immune systems) encounter everyday are toxic. However, in most instances our bodies are fully capable of handling them. Our bodies are amazing, but not full proof. The stuff we come by while working on our cars can be very damaging if we are not careful. Basically, take care of yourself and your body will take care of the rest. Wear gloves when needed (I usually just got with some latexes, since I don't like wearing gloves hehe), wear a respirator with a filter when dealing with a lot of airborne debris and chemicals, and wash up throughout your project. Oh yeah, wear safety glasses. Almost forgot haha

Then again, pretty much everyone on this forum already knows this stuff. I personally just get lazy even if it'll bite me a little bit later on ;)
 

Dusty Landrum

Supporting VIP
245
144
Jul 15, 2019
San Francisco, California
You are so correct about all the things you said dude. Its not even just the metals in things either, its everything overall. I remember hearing the stories from old timers in the hanger or shops talk about what they used and how they would wash their hands with chemicals that are now banned in the US (much less in California LOL). Crazy stuff. Luckily there are really good alternatives now such as lead free solder etc, and even though some cleaners are not "magic" like they used to be and takes a little more work, its waaaaay better for both people AND the environment. As a very avid outdoorsman and fly fisher I truly care about how we treat ourselves and nature. So even though I may have to scrub a little harder using simple green while wearing my gloves, I am more that willing to do it. And please ALWAYS recycle your oils and what you can.
 

steve

DSM Wiseman
13,677
774
Feb 3, 2002
Boulder, Colorado
Some risks are overstated (for normal people). Lead is a good example, unless you work in a battery factory or like eating it, normal hobbyist exposure isn't a problem. I've been soldering things for at least 50 years and I asked to be tested to find out. There wasn't any buildup or lead in my system.

I'm not suggesting being stupid like breathing solvents, welding zinc, or spraying paint without eye protection. It's a good idea to wear gloves when you change the oil or work on the car but you're not going to die if you get your hands dirty just keep away from caustics and acids.
 
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