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Garage renovation

gsxitement

Proven Member
1,611
915
Dec 9, 2002
DOBBS FERRY, New_York
Rounding the corner on the garage update. Started putting up some shelving. Getting stuff off the floor in preparation for the epoxy. Also got the heater in. That should be getting mounted and wired this week. Then maybe this weekend, epoxy the floor, then run the rest of the electric. Getting there slowly but surely.
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1990TSIAWDTALON

Moderator
9,146
4,977
Nov 14, 2013
Independence, Kansas
I like the heater, how big is your garage/shop? It is coming along nicely!
 

Ludachris

Founder & Zookeeper
7,894
2,519
Nov 12, 2001
Newcastle, California
Rounding the corner on the garage update. Started putting up some shelving. Getting stuff off the floor in preparation for the epoxy. Also got the heater in. That should be getting mounted and wired this week. Then maybe this weekend, epoxy the floor, then run the rest of the electric. Getting there slowly but surely.
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That's the route I'll probably go too, not that it gets too terribly cold out here all that often. But a little more comfort isn't a bad thing.
 

pauleyman

DSM Wiseman
8,011
2,607
Nov 19, 2011
oklahoma city, Oklahoma
Rounding the corner on the garage update. Started putting up some shelving. Getting stuff off the floor in preparation for the epoxy. Also got the heater in. That should be getting mounted and wired this week. Then maybe this weekend, epoxy the floor, then run the rest of the electric. Getting there slowly but surely.
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30k but might be a little slow if you're warming up from dead cold. I have a radiant 30k and it's fine but takes awhile if the garage is dead cold. I'm about 450 Sq ft and mostly uninsulated. Wish I would've done a vented heater or electric like you did. This is a ventless heater for me.
 
Last edited:

snowborder714

Moderator
16,158
319
Oct 15, 2006
Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania
Sorry for the long delay but here is my before/current shots and information. Also sorry for the long post/thread hijack!!

I bought my house with a four-car garage (just shy of 900 sq. ft.) back in 2017. The garage was a big selling point. It's not nearly as big as I'd like (just parking a quad cab truck in here is tight) and I can't install a lift, but it's done a great job so far, and figured it needed a bit of a makeover/upgrade.

This is how the garage looked after I moved my stuff in.

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In 2018, I had the original wooden garage doors replaced with R-12 insulated Garaga doors along with new Liftmaster 8355W openers. The old doors were "smiling" and the corners were showing a lot of light and letting in a lot of stuff.

In 2019, I had both of the person doors replaced. The white one in the above picture goes to a breezeway that then leads to the house. I installed a fire-rated door here to be up to code. I replaced the rear door (near the blue barrel) with a half window door to let in some light. At this time, I didn't have a shed so all of my lawn equipment had to live in the garage. Purchasing one later in 2019 was one of the best decisions I made as not only did it free up a ton of garage space but it also eliminated any of the equipment tracking grass and dirt in the garage.

After using it like that for three years with just the above upgrades, I wanted to make some changes. Lighting was a big one. Only having three overhead bulbs did not provide nearly enough light and most of the time working on stuff was with a headlamp. I also needed to add some outlets since there were not many available so everything needed an extension cord to use. Lastly, I wanted to at least insulate the ceiling since the garage was an icebox in the winter and a sauna in the summer.

In 2020, I had my house electrical panel upgraded from 100A to 200A. This allowed me to then have a 100A sub panel installed in the garage. I had plans for lots of outlets (both 110v and 220v), a ton of LED lights, a mini-split, and a generator input in case the power goes out for an extended period of time. I also planned for a 110v circuit out to the shed for a few lights and outlets.

Over the past year, @turbosax2 and I (along with help from family and friends) did a ton of work to the place. We started off by painting all of the walls with Drylock. This immediately brightened up the place.

The next thing we tackled was the wiring. This was a project like no other! I was learning wiring on the fly and consulting with the guy who did my panel upgrade, who was nice enough to help out with all of my questions. I wanted to do this project myself as, in theory, wiring isn't hard. What I hadn't planned for was how much reading of the National Electrical Code book I was going to do. Just in my time alone to do that, I probably could've paid someone else to wire the garage for me. But I had particular ways I envisioned it which sadly didn't work out the more I dug into the code. The original plan was to do surface-mounted metal conduits everywhere but after learning about fill capacity and derating, I would've had to run four conduit runs to house all of the wires. That wasn't going to look good and was going to cost a lot of money. I didn't want PVC just because of the looks. That left me with Romex. We rewired the back patio and the breezeway at the same time as well as ran CAT6 cable for security cameras and a wireless access point.

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Once the wiring was all buttoned up, the mini-split installation took place. My electrician came through big time by letting me borrow a heavy-duty hammer drill. This thing was massive! It had a few different bits for it, including some core bits. These were necessary to allow the line set, drain line, and electrical run through the cinder block wall. There were a few head-scratching moments in this install, but in the end, everything worked out. The track along the chimney has all of the power wires for the mini-split (pass through the disconnect box right under the motor), generator plug (the box under the disconnect), and shed circuit. The track that comes out from behind the motor has the line set, low voltage power wire that connects the head to the motor, and the drain tube. And it just so happens I went with a 24k Mitsubishi unit :)

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A ceiling and blown-in insulation were next on the list. I didn't want to drywall the ceiling since I did not plan on doing anything to the cinderblock and figured it'd look too "nice". After looking at a few options, I opted for an insulated bubble roll ceiling. In the end, I wasn't terribly pleased with the look of it and probably would not do it again. It didn't help that the company that did it is not nearly as detail-oriented as we are. One thing we found afterward was metal siding which looked pretty darn good as a ceiling but probably would've cost a lot more. The company then blew in 11.76" of loose-fill cellulose insulation in the attic which achieves an R-38 value. I did put a semi-hidden access panel in the middle of the garage in case I need to get up above the ceiling. Just a simple wood board over a hole between the joists that you use an 8' ladder to go through and then cover it with the ceiling material to have it blend in.

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Once the ceiling was done, the lighting went up (again). As you can see in some of the older pictures, we had the lights up well before the rest of the project as it was needed for a lot of it. It was a lot harder to install with the bubble wrap in place. The lights are 4' Barrina LEDs from Amazon. I have 38 lights on the ceiling and two under the hanging cabinets. This is a TON of light (on the verge of being slightly too bright if you walk in from it being dark outside). It's fairly rare I need a headlamp anymore unless I'm under a car.

One thing I was not a fan of from the beginning was the shelves. While they worked great, they and their contents got dirty. Part of this was due to the open ceiling so closing it off would definitely help. But I had been eyeing some cabinets for a while and with the egging on from Eric, I purchased some NewAge Pro cabinets. They were a bit of a bear to install because I did not plan for them when doing the wiring but they turned out really nice. Something I hadn't pictured myself spending thousands of dollars on, but they are so worth it. They really class the garage up and keep everything dust-free.

I also added a TV with the intent of either streaming stuff while working in the garage or using it as a big monitor when working with ECMlink or my RaceCapture. So far, I haven't used it much.

The last project that we just finished up tonight is the bike rack. We've both taken up cycling recently and wanted to get them off the ground. I found the racks I wanted to use (Steadyrack) but didn't want them in a fixed position so we bolted them to some extruded aluminum from TNUTZ.

Here's what the garage looks like today. Let me know if you have any questions!

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gsxitement

Proven Member
1,611
915
Dec 9, 2002
DOBBS FERRY, New_York
Wow!!!!! That looks awesome! Wish I had the room for those cabinets. I love that setup. I’m actually putting together a design on Sketch up to make a new bench. Also just got the heater in place. Guys are wiring it up today. Then we’re doing the epoxy floor next week. Getting close to being usable again.
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Ludachris

Founder & Zookeeper
7,894
2,519
Nov 12, 2001
Newcastle, California
Sorry for the long delay but here is my before/current shots and information. Also sorry for the long post/thread hijack!!

I bought my house with a four-car garage (just shy of 900 sq. ft.) back in 2017. The garage was a big selling point. It's not nearly as big as I'd like (just parking a quad cab truck in here is tight) and I can't install a lift, but it's done a great job so far, and figured it needed a bit of a makeover/upgrade.

This is how the garage looked after I moved my stuff in.

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In 2018, I had the original wooden garage doors replaced with R-12 insulated Garaga doors along with new Liftmaster 8355W openers. The old doors were "smiling" and the corners were showing a lot of light and letting in a lot of stuff.

In 2019, I had both of the person doors replaced. The white one in the above picture goes to a breezeway that then leads to the house. I installed a fire-rated door here to be up to code. I replaced the rear door (near the blue barrel) with a half window door to let in some light. At this time, I didn't have a shed so all of my lawn equipment had to live in the garage. Purchasing one later in 2019 was one of the best decisions I made as not only did it free up a ton of garage space but it also eliminated any of the equipment tracking grass and dirt in the garage.

After using it like that for three years with just the above upgrades, I wanted to make some changes. Lighting was a big one. Only having three overhead bulbs did not provide nearly enough light and most of the time working on stuff was with a headlamp. I also needed to add some outlets since there were not many available so everything needed an extension cord to use. Lastly, I wanted to at least insulate the ceiling since the garage was an icebox in the winter and a sauna in the summer.

In 2020, I had my house electrical panel upgraded from 100A to 200A. This allowed me to then have a 100A sub panel installed in the garage. I had plans for lots of outlets (both 110v and 220v), a ton of LED lights, a mini-split, and a generator input in case the power goes out for an extended period of time. I also planned for a 110v circuit out to the shed for a few lights and outlets.

Over the past year, @turbosax2 and I (along with help from family and friends) did a ton of work to the place. We started off by painting all of the walls with Drylock. This immediately brightened up the place.

The next thing we tackled was the wiring. This was a project like no other! I was learning wiring on the fly and consulting with the guy who did my panel upgrade, who was nice enough to help out with all of my questions. I wanted to do this project myself as, in theory, wiring isn't hard. What I hadn't planned for was how much reading of the National Electrical Code book I was going to do. Just in my time alone to do that, I probably could've paid someone else to wire the garage for me. But I had particular ways I envisioned it which sadly didn't work out the more I dug into the code. The original plan was to do surface-mounted metal conduits everywhere but after learning about fill capacity and derating, I would've had to run four conduit runs to house all of the wires. That wasn't going to look good and was going to cost a lot of money. I didn't want PVC just because of the looks. That left me with Romex. We rewired the back patio and the breezeway at the same time as well as ran CAT6 cable for security cameras and a wireless access point.

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Once the wiring was all buttoned up, the mini-split installation took place. My electrician came through big time by letting me borrow a heavy-duty hammer drill. This thing was massive! It had a few different bits for it, including some core bits. These were necessary to allow the line set, drain line, and electrical run through the cinder block wall. There were a few head-scratching moments in this install, but in the end, everything worked out. The track along the chimney has all of the power wires for the mini-split (pass through the disconnect box right under the motor), generator plug (the box under the disconnect), and shed circuit. The track that comes out from behind the motor has the line set, low voltage power wire that connects the head to the motor, and the drain tube. And it just so happens I went with a 24k Mitsubishi unit :)

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A ceiling and blown-in insulation were next on the list. I didn't want to drywall the ceiling since I did not plan on doing anything to the cinderblock and figured it'd look too "nice". After looking at a few options, I opted for an insulated bubble roll ceiling. In the end, I wasn't terribly pleased with the look of it and probably would not do it again. It didn't help that the company that did it is not nearly as detail-oriented as we are. One thing we found afterward was metal siding which looked pretty darn good as a ceiling but probably would've cost a lot more. The company then blew in 11.76" of loose-fill cellulose insulation in the attic which achieves an R-38 value. I did put a semi-hidden access panel in the middle of the garage in case I need to get up above the ceiling. Just a simple wood board over a hole between the joists that you use an 8' ladder to go through and then cover it with the ceiling material to have it blend in.

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Once the ceiling was done, the lighting went up (again). As you can see in some of the older pictures, we had the lights up well before the rest of the project as it was needed for a lot of it. It was a lot harder to install with the bubble wrap in place. The lights are 4' Barrina LEDs from Amazon. I have 38 lights on the ceiling and two under the hanging cabinets. This is a TON of light (on the verge of being slightly too bright if you walk in from it being dark outside). It's fairly rare I need a headlamp anymore unless I'm under a car.

One thing I was not a fan of from the beginning was the shelves. While they worked great, they and their contents got dirty. Part of this was due to the open ceiling so closing it off would definitely help. But I had been eyeing some cabinets for a while and with the egging on from Eric, I purchased them. They were a bit of a bear to install because I did not plan for them when doing the wiring but they turned out really nice. Something I hadn't pictured myself spending thousands of dollars on, but they are so worth it. They really class the garage up and keep everything dust-free.

I also added a TV with the intent of either streaming stuff while working in the garage or using it as a big monitor when working with ECMlink or my RaceCapture. So far, I haven't used it much.

The last project that we just finished up tonight is the bike rack. We've both taken up cycling recently and wanted to get them off the ground. I found the racks I wanted to use (Steadyrack) but didn't want them in a fixed position so we bolted them to some extruded aluminum from TNUTZ.

Here's what the garage looks like today. Let me know if you have any questions!

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Really like the New Age cabinets, was close to pulling the trigger on some but Costco ran out (they had them much cheaper than anywhere else). Ended up going with Husky cabinets when they were on sale.
 

idkiliketurbos

Proven Member
780
119
Mar 2, 2009
Appleton, Wisconsin
I love those NewAge garage cabinets. I have been looking to redo my garage and get a set of them as well to keep things from getting dusty and make everything a bit cleaner looking. I just recently installed a Mr Heater 50,000 btu natural gas forced air heater and I LOVE it. My garage is 25' x 26' with 10ft ceilings and it heats it up to 65 in about 15 minutes in the 20 degree outside temps. I look forward to seeing everyone's progress with the garage updates!
 

pauleyman

DSM Wiseman
8,011
2,607
Nov 19, 2011
oklahoma city, Oklahoma
While we're discussing dust and such. I purchased 3 of the better welded (not bolt together) gladiator hanging cabinets for above the workbench. All of my consumables go in there. I also have 5, 18" deep 48" wide wire rack shelving units and I purchased a bunch of those black and yellow tubs from the box store. Various sizes as appropriate. I labeled every box and cataloged the contents in my phone and it's searchable. So when I need a 3" deck screw I know where it is and how many I have. The trick is to update the list as I use stuff. So far so good. Also keeps me from purchasing something I already have when I go to the box store for a project. Everything is now dust-free except for anything I choose to leave loose or is just too big to fit in a box.
 

gsxitement

Proven Member
1,611
915
Dec 9, 2002
DOBBS FERRY, New_York
While we're discussing dust and such. I purchased 3 of the better welded (not bolt together) gladiator hanging cabinets for above the workbench. All of my consumables go in there. I also have 5, 18" deep 48" wide wire rack shelving units and I purchased a bunch of those black and yellow tubs from the box store. Various sizes as appropriate. I labeled every box and cataloged the contents in my phone and it's searchable. So when I need a 3" deck screw I know where it is and how many I have. The trick is to update the list as I use stuff. So far so good. Also keeps me from purchasing something I already have when I got to the box store for a project. Everything is now dust-free except for anything I choose to leave loose or is just too big to fit in a box.
Excellent info! I really like that you run an inventory on all your stuff. I have to get better at that. I really need to figure out organization since so much of my floor space is taken up by the trailer being in the garage along with the car.
 

pauleyman

DSM Wiseman
8,011
2,607
Nov 19, 2011
oklahoma city, Oklahoma
Excellent info! I really like that you run an inventory on all your stuff. I have to get better at that. I really need to figure out organization since so much of my floor space is taken up by the trailer being in the garage along with the car.
Yeah, it works really well. I have totes for yard-related hardware, yard chemicals, hardware, plumbing, electrical etc etc. You can make a tote for anything
 

snowborder714

Moderator
16,158
319
Oct 15, 2006
Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania
Really like the New Age cabinets, was close to pulling the trigger on some but Costco ran out (they had them much cheaper than anywhere else). Ended up going with Husky cabinets when they were on sale.

I had gone back and forth between the NewAge and Husky for a bit. The NewAge Pro is a step above the Husky which is a step above the NewAge Bold. In the end, the NewAge won out because of the fact that it perfectly fit on that wall in the configuration (I bought all of that as a kit) and I liked the bottom cabinets better. I also liked the color selection better, but that was not as important. But I've read great things about both companies and would not have hesitated to go with the Husky.
 

Ludachris

Founder & Zookeeper
7,894
2,519
Nov 12, 2001
Newcastle, California
The NewAge Pro is a step above the Husky which is a step above the NewAge Bold
Well that's good to know, as I would probably have been getting the NewAge Bold if I didn't go with Husky. I just wish Husky had the wider, not so tall uppers and a few more drawer cabinet options like NewAge does. Oh well.
 

Dericsh

Supporting Member
1,092
403
Nov 25, 2002
Pearl River, Louisiana
While we're discussing dust and such. I purchased 3 of the better welded (not bolt together) gladiator hanging cabinets for above the workbench. All of my consumables go in there. I also have 5, 18" deep 48" wide wire rack shelving units and I purchased a bunch of those black and yellow tubs from the box store. Various sizes as appropriate. I labeled every box and cataloged the contents in my phone and it's searchable. So when I need a 3" deck screw I know where it is and how many I have. The trick is to update the list as I use stuff. So far so good. Also keeps me from purchasing something I already have when I go to the box store for a project. Everything is now dust-free except for anything I choose to leave loose or is just too big to fit in a box.
I wish I could be that organized!
 

gsxitement

Proven Member
1,611
915
Dec 9, 2002
DOBBS FERRY, New_York
Alright…..garage floor is washed and etched. Contractor said I didn’t need to etch the surface cause it’s a new floor, but I figured it isn’t going to hurt. Then I turned on the heater to 60 degrees and closed the garage door to let it heat up the garage. So today when I get home, it’s time! Got the Rust-Oleum garage floor coating. Really excited to get this done and finished. Then I can work on getting the garage setup. I’ve been building a workbench in SketchUp to see what I can make work. Excited!
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gsxitement

Proven Member
1,611
915
Dec 9, 2002
DOBBS FERRY, New_York
Got the epoxy down yesterday. Didn’t go as heavy as I should’ve with the paint. Should’ve definitely put down a heavier coat. But it still looks ok. Went and bought the clear coat as well to make another layer of protection for the floor. At the end of the day. It’s still better than what I had originally.
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1990TSIAWDTALON

Moderator
9,146
4,977
Nov 14, 2013
Independence, Kansas
Question......does the coating make the surface more slippery?
I asked a shop about floor coating back when mine was going up and they said "Go see for yourself, it gets slippery", so I didn't coat mine but I REALLY REALLY LIKE YOURS!!!! :thumb:
 

Dericsh

Supporting Member
1,092
403
Nov 25, 2002
Pearl River, Louisiana
Question......does the coating make the surface more slippery?
I asked a shop about floor coating back when mine was going up and they said "Go see for yourself, it gets slippery", so I didn't coat mine but I REALLY REALLY LIKE YOURS!!!! :thumb:
I used rocksolid (wouldn’t recommend) and it was insanely slippery. Had to add the clear coat with slip resistance in it and that made it much better.
 

gsxitement

Proven Member
1,611
915
Dec 9, 2002
DOBBS FERRY, New_York
Question......does the coating make the surface more slippery?
I asked a shop about floor coating back when mine was going up and they said "Go see for yourself, it gets slippery", so I didn't coat mine but I REALLY REALLY LIKE YOURS!!!! :thumb:
The clear has anti-skid like powder in there if you wanna mix it in. I’m not sure if I’m going to do it or not. They want you to mix it in with the clear, but I don’t know if it’ll affect the finish. And thanks! Should’ve gone thicker but too late now.
 

Dericsh

Supporting Member
1,092
403
Nov 25, 2002
Pearl River, Louisiana
Question......does the coating make the surface more slippery?

The clear has anti-skid like powder in there if you wanna mix it in. I’m not sure if I’m going to do it or not. They want you to mix it in with the clear, but I don’t know if it’ll affect the finish. And thanks! Should’ve gone thicker but too late now.
It definitely dulled my finish quite a bit. But that was desirable to me. I wasn’t really looking for a museum showroom type of shine like high gloss gray was.
 

gsxitement

Proven Member
1,611
915
Dec 9, 2002
DOBBS FERRY, New_York
So I talked to a buddy of mine who convinced me to not settle on the floor since I wasn’t 100% happy with it. So I got another kit and repainted the floor last night. Instead of using a roller tray, I just cut open the pouch and poured it directly on the floor. Used both pouches this time. Much happier with the look of the floor. Didn’t over do it with the flakes cause I don’t really like a floor thats all flake. Definitely much more satisfied. So now I’ll wait for it to cure and do the clear over it and the floor will be done. Then it’s just some cabinets mounted on the wall and some trim stuff and it’ll be ready to move in. Can’t wait to start working on the car in here.
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