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2G Car still won’t start

98gstJames

Proven Member
111
23
May 25, 2022
Virginia
Alright so I’ve been trying to get my car to start and I’ve done a lot, what does it sound like my car is missing now? I’ll add a video, I’m just lost

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98gstJames

Proven Member
111
23
May 25, 2022
Virginia
Agreed but there are two places offhand that grab my attention.

On the bottom the R701 resistor looks unusual.

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On the top there is a circuit trace in an area of silkscreening that doesn't look right.

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Should I be getting a new ecu? The obd2 scanner came in the mail today and this is what it says on my coolant temp, etc.

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Agreed but there are two places offhand that grab my attention.

On the bottom the R701 resistor looks unusual.

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On the top there is a circuit trace in an area of silkscreening that doesn't look right.

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I looked in the ecu just now and the silkscreening part you were talking about on the top isn’t there anymore, Im not sure if that was a tiny piece of dirt from the shop or what but that definitely isn’t burned, but the other you pointed out is definitely not good.

Should I be getting a new ecu? The obd2 scanner came in the mail today and this is what it says on my coolant temp, etc.

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Turned the key over while the obd2 was hooked in and it changed the timing advance to 6 degrees

I took another video of the sparking this time i turned the motor over for 15 seconds and this is how it looked. I’ll post the regular and slowed down version this time.

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waltah

10+ Year Contributor
369
154
Mar 2, 2011
fairfield, Virginia
Looks like a bad ECU all right. On the top at the lower right, three pins up on the main connector looks like another burned area and the other end of the trace from that pin looks bad around the plated-through hole. This apparent damage is probably associated with the R701 problem on the other side -- both connect to IC-17 on top.

These problems may be repairable. The deeper issue is: What caused this? That's likely to be a part or wiring failure out in the car some place -- maybe a shorted connector on an injector or something like that. It would be good to be sure that problem is fixed before repairing/replacing the ECU since those are $100-$several hundred and bad car wiring might blow the new one.

Is there a circuit diagram for these ECUs out there? Or do we need to try to figure it out from the board? I've never tried to diagnose something like this before.
 

98gstJames

Proven Member
111
23
May 25, 2022
Virginia
Looks like a bad ECU all right. On the top at the lower right, three pins up on the main connector looks like another burned area and the other end of the trace from that pin looks bad around the plated-through hole. This apparent damage is probably associated with the R701 problem on the other side -- both connect to IC-17 on top.

These problems may be repairable. The deeper issue is: What caused this? That's likely to be a part or wiring failure out in the car some place -- maybe a shorted connector on an injector or something like that. It would be good to be sure that problem is fixed before repairing/replacing the ECU since those are $100-$several hundred and bad car wiring might blow the new one.

Is there a circuit diagram for these ECUs out there? Or do we need to try to figure it out from the board? I've never tried to diagnose something like this before.
Where would I go to get my ecu repaired?
 

waltah

10+ Year Contributor
369
154
Mar 2, 2011
fairfield, Virginia
Where would I go to get my ecu repaired?
There's a DSM sponsor who does it -- ExtremePSI maybe? Look at their web site.

Sometimes new units are available pretty cheaply and I always try to have a spare. Does anyone have a list of the various interchanges that will work?

I pulled out a dead original '95 GS-T ECU last night: Same function and connections as yours but has more discrete components and fewer ICs so it's easier to figure out. The corner of the board with the blown R701 and overheated trace drives the injectors and that overheated trace appears to go to pin 2 which is injector #3. Four power transistors as injector drivers on my board are replaced by IC 17 on yours so that's a quad transistor driving your injectors. Unfortunately the numbers on it don't turn up on a quick search so that's likely a Mitsubishi house number -- they make transistors too. If something inside it is dead it might not be easy to replace. ('House' devices may or may not have a general market equivalent.) But -- the people who try to repair your unit will know all about that.

Now we know why injector #3 doesn't go tic-tic-tic. #4 is probably a related issue -- R701 may be involved in both circuits.

How did this happen? A short where you noticed the damaged connection at the injector would be a good bet. So those connectors must be replaced before trying any working ECU.

Replacements usually come with crimp connectors which are fine for emergencies but they produce weak spots in the wire that concentrate stress from vibration -- do solder joints with shrink on tubing for insulation if you can, for a 'life of the car' repair Everything you need is in automotive electrical at Wal-Mart.

Inspect everything in those circuits. In additional to visual, check out high impedance/low impedance injectors and whether you have the resistor pack needed if you have the low impedance injectors. OE was low impedance with resistors but many old cars have been modified and the combination of low impedance (OE) injectors with a removed resistor pack could be an ECU killer.

Quick check: On the widest ECU connector the four pins at the end nearest the side of the ECU are the injector drive lines. On the plug (harness) side use an ohmmeter to measure between the pins of any two pairs --- top/bottom, left/right, etc. With the injectors plugged in, this measures resistance through an injector, through its resistor to the connection to the MFI relay (where the injectors get power), then back through another resistor and that injector to the other pin of your pair on the plug. This should be two injectors at 2.5 ohms each (OE) plus two resistors at 6 ohms for a total of 17 ohms. A digital ohmmeter would be ideal but an analog one that's got an ohms x1 scale and is carefully zeroed will do -- you just want to know that they're all the same and not too low. This will confirm that (a) you have continuity, (b) don't have a short, and (c) don't have low impedance injectors with a removed resistor pack.

Also check from any of those four pins to ground -- should be open.

The new spark plug test confirms that we're not seeing just a camera oddity but real data. I will ask for one more try with a slightly different setup to see if we can isolate another problem -- maybe a weak coil or something. I will write that story tonight.

Well ... we pretty well guessed at the start that this wasn't a simple problem, right? People mostly don't sell cars with simple problems.
 

DSSA

Supporting Vendor
637
441
Jul 26, 2002
Hatfield, Pennsylvania
I don't have time to read the whole thread, nor track down the other threads at the moment, but has the OP confirmed where the CAS is set, and how it is wired? I didn't see OP mention that it's a 1G CAS, and only see it in the picture here (black arrows):

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I would swap the plug wires (23-41) just for a quick check to make sure something funky wasn't done with adding the 1G CAS into the mix, then reverse if no improvement and check that base timing is somewhere in the realm of being realistic. From the sounds of it cranking, it sounds like the firing order is correct but timing is off, but I'd check as this car seems to have some demons.
 

waltah

10+ Year Contributor
369
154
Mar 2, 2011
fairfield, Virginia
I don't have time to read the whole thread, nor track down the other threads at the moment, but has the OP confirmed where the CAS is set, and how it is wired? I didn't see OP mention that it's a 1G CAS, and only see it in the picture here (black arrows):
He has a bad ECU causing two injectors to be non-operative and although the plugs spark in correct pairs some of them don't spark as often as they should. It is not known yet that they spark when the cylinder is at TDC so there could be some screw up there but until the current issues are sorted out it doesn't matter very much.

If I've counted right, three out of four cylinders are inoperative -- two 'no fuel, and I think one 'mostly no spark.' That's enough to explain "won't start."

It's a long complicated thread and yes, demons.
 

98gstJames

Proven Member
111
23
May 25, 2022
Virginia
There's a DSM sponsor who does it -- ExtremePSI maybe? Look at their web site.

Sometimes new units are available pretty cheaply and I always try to have a spare. Does anyone have a list of the various interchanges that will work?

I pulled out a dead original '95 GS-T ECU last night: Same function and connections as yours but has more discrete components and fewer ICs so it's easier to figure out. The corner of the board with the blown R701 and overheated trace drives the injectors and that overheated trace appears to go to pin 2 which is injector #3. Four power transistors as injector drivers on my board are replaced by IC 17 on yours so that's a quad transistor driving your injectors. Unfortunately the numbers on it don't turn up on a quick search so that's likely a Mitsubishi house number -- they make transistors too. If something inside it is dead it might not be easy to replace. ('House' devices may or may not have a general market equivalent.) But -- the people who try to repair your unit will know all about that.

Now we know why injector #3 doesn't go tic-tic-tic. #4 is probably a related issue -- R701 may be involved in both circuits.

How did this happen? A short where you noticed the damaged connection at the injector would be a good bet. So those connectors must be replaced before trying any working ECU.

Replacements usually come with crimp connectors which are fine for emergencies but they produce weak spots in the wire that concentrate stress from vibration -- do solder joints with shrink on tubing for insulation if you can, for a 'life of the car' repair Everything you need is in automotive electrical at Wal-Mart.

Inspect everything in those circuits. In additional to visual, check out high impedance/low impedance injectors and whether you have the resistor pack needed if you have the low impedance injectors. OE was low impedance with resistors but many old cars have been modified and the combination of low impedance (OE) injectors with a removed resistor pack could be an ECU killer.

Quick check: On the widest ECU connector the four pins at the end nearest the side of the ECU are the injector drive lines. On the plug (harness) side use an ohmmeter to measure between the pins of any two pairs --- top/bottom, left/right, etc. With the injectors plugged in, this measures resistance through an injector, through its resistor to the connection to the MFI relay (where the injectors get power), then back through another resistor and that injector to the other pin of your pair on the plug. This should be two injectors at 2.5 ohms each (OE) plus two resistors at 6 ohms for a total of 17 ohms. A digital ohmmeter would be ideal but an analog one that's got an ohms x1 scale and is carefully zeroed will do -- you just want to know that they're all the same and not too low. This will confirm that (a) you have continuity, (b) don't have a short, and (c) don't have low impedance injectors with a removed resistor pack.

Also check from any of those four pins to ground -- should be open.

The new spark plug test confirms that we're not seeing just a camera oddity but real data. I will ask for one more try with a slightly different setup to see if we can isolate another problem -- maybe a weak coil or something. I will write that story tonight.

Well ... we pretty well guessed at the start that this wasn't a simple problem, right? People mostly don't sell cars with simple problems.
I was trying to film the video the best I could and I tried waiting for darkness while keeping the old lady happy, and that was my best compromise, I also had to do it alone that time so I couldn’t get the best angle on it but I will definitely get one more angle where you can see the spark clear like my first video I posted but with the extended length ofc, looked on the website you said to look on and could only find stand alone ECUs on there for stage 2, is there anywhere else you would suggest looking?
 

waltah

10+ Year Contributor
369
154
Mar 2, 2011
fairfield, Virginia
I was trying to film the video the best I could and I tried waiting for darkness while keeping the old lady happy, and that was my best compromise, I also had to do it alone that time so I couldn’t get the best angle on it but I will definitely get one more angle where you can see the spark clear like my first video I posted but with the extended length ofc, looked on the website you said to look on and could only find stand alone ECUs on there for stage 2, is there anywhere else you would suggest looking?
I know I saw ECU repair service on one of the DSM vendors sites ... I had a crapped out one at the time. Had prices, everything. I'll take a look in the next day or two. Did you try a site search for 'ECU (or ECM) repair'?

The video you got was fine for what we were trying to do then -- decide whether there was some camera/video issue fooling us about missing sparks. It was not so good for counting sparks on each plug to be sure that every plug was firing every time but that's okay: There's new data that would be useful and you can kill two birds with one stone.

The first video was pretty clear: 2&3 fire at the same time and so do 1&4 -- that's correct. However 11 sparks on 2&3 plugs and only 6 on 1&4 is not right -- except for the effect of a partial revolution the number has to be the same on all the plugs. So if 11 on 2&3, then there should be from 10 to 12 on 1&4. Sum Ting Wong if you don't get that.

The possibilities are: a bad ECU, a bad transistor assembly, a bad coil, a bad wire, a bad plug.

The setup this time should be the same as the first except swap the #1 & #4 plug wires in that coil leaving the plugs on the same wires. Be sure to note which plug is where in the layout. In the first test sparks on one of the plugs seemed weaker than the other and if so, the problem is coil/wire/plug -- not the ECU or transistor because problems there hit both of the two firing plugs equally. The swap should make it possible to tell whether it's coil or wire/plug.

Plug gaps are all the same, right?

Because we want to see a difference in the strength of the sparks in addition to the number, please shoot from above as in the first video and turn all the plugs in their connectors so the arm is down and the open side of the gap is up.

Video can be about the same length as the first one -- five seconds is plenty -- but it's much easier to count if it's in one piece so hold 'START' if you can.

When you've shot that video leave the plugs (etc.) the same but move the camera so it shows all of the ignition HV system -- plugs, wires, and coils -- and shoot in total darkness. It's not uncommon for a flash in the wrong place (like inside a coil) to be visible in the dark. Plug wires, even plugs too. A flash in the wrong place is -- 'bad part -- replace that.'

Don't worry if you don't have time right now -- just do it when you can. We'll all still be here in a few days and Domestic Tranquility Is Important. ;-)
 

98gstJames

Proven Member
111
23
May 25, 2022
Virginia
I know I saw ECU repair service on one of the DSM vendors sites ... I had a crapped out one at the time. Had prices, everything. I'll take a look in the next day or two. Did you try a site search for 'ECU (or ECM) repair'?

...

Plug gaps are all the same, right?

Yes the plug gaps are all the same, .028 I wanted to be sure of that bc I also noticed one of the sparks was weaker than the others. I also thought it was possibly a bad wire but I cleaned the connection from the coil to the wire and thought it might help but it didn’t so I’ll try and get new wires?

My new injector plugs should be here today so I’ll get all of that wired in along with shooting the two videos, for the other angle for the ignition hv system, should you be able to see the timing belt in that angle if I’m thinking right?

I also was looking into the ecu repair and found a company on eBay that has a good rep and is $130 for the repair, so I was going to do that and was also trying to get another ecu for a spare.
 

Jonnyeclipse

Proven Member
60
64
May 29, 2021
Edmonton, AB_Canada
Yes the plug gaps are all the same, .028 I wanted to be sure of that bc I also noticed one of the sparks was weaker than the others. I also thought it was possibly a bad wire but I cleaned the connection from the coil to the wire and thought it might help but it didn’t so I’ll try and get new wires?

My new injector plugs should be here today so I’ll get all of that wired in along with shooting the two videos, for the other angle for the ignition hv system, should you be able to see the timing belt in that angle if I’m thinking right?

I also was looking into the ecu repair and found a company on eBay that has a good rep and is $130 for the repair, so I was going to do that and was also trying to get another ecu for a spare.
If the ECU is determined to be the problem then I would contact ECMTUNING. They are a supporting vendor here. They can also replace those leaky capacitors/assess and repair any damage. And socket it for ECMLINK if it is EPROM at the same time. I wouldn’t trust anyone else with my ECU. I have a spare non EPROM 95 GSX ECU that I could part with. I am in Canada though.
 

98gstJames

Proven Member
111
23
May 25, 2022
Virginia
There's a DSM sponsor who does it -- ExtremePSI maybe? Look at their web site.

Sometimes new units are available pretty cheaply and I always try to have a spare. Does anyone have a list of the various interchanges that will work?

I pulled out a dead original '95 GS-T ECU last night: Same function and connections as yours but has more discrete components and fewer ICs so it's easier to figure out. The corner of the board with the blown R701 and overheated trace drives the injectors and that overheated trace appears to go to pin 2 which is injector #3. Four power transistors as injector drivers on my board are replaced by IC 17 on yours so that's a quad transistor driving your injectors. Unfortunately the numbers on it don't turn up on a quick search so that's likely a Mitsubishi house number -- they make transistors too. If something inside it is dead it might not be easy to replace. ('House' devices may or may not have a general market equivalent.) But -- the people who try to repair your unit will know all about that.

Now we know why injector #3 doesn't go tic-tic-tic. #4 is probably a related issue -- R701 may be involved in both circuits.

How did this happen? A short where you noticed the damaged connection at the injector would be a good bet. So those connectors must be replaced before trying any working ECU.

Replacements usually come with crimp connectors which are fine for emergencies but they produce weak spots in the wire that concentrate stress from vibration -- do solder joints with shrink on tubing for insulation if you can, for a 'life of the car' repair Everything you need is in automotive electrical at Wal-Mart.

Inspect everything in those circuits. In additional to visual, check out high impedance/low impedance injectors and whether you have the resistor pack needed if you have the low impedance injectors. OE was low impedance with resistors but many old cars have been modified and the combination of low impedance (OE) injectors with a removed resistor pack could be an ECU killer.

Quick check: On the widest ECU connector the four pins at the end nearest the side of the ECU are the injector drive lines. On the plug (harness) side use an ohmmeter to measure between the pins of any two pairs --- top/bottom, left/right, etc. With the injectors plugged in, this measures resistance through an injector, through its resistor to the connection to the MFI relay (where the injectors get power), then back through another resistor and that injector to the other pin of your pair on the plug. This should be two injectors at 2.5 ohms each (OE) plus two resistors at 6 ohms for a total of 17 ohms. A digital ohmmeter would be ideal but an analog one that's got an ohms x1 scale and is carefully zeroed will do -- you just want to know that they're all the same and not too low. This will confirm that (a) you have continuity, (b) don't have a short, and (c) don't have low impedance injectors with a removed resistor pack.

Also check from any of those four pins to ground -- should be open.

The new spark plug test confirms that we're not seeing just a camera oddity but real data. I will ask for one more try with a slightly different setup to see if we can isolate another problem -- maybe a weak coil or something. I will write that story tonight.

Well ... we pretty well guessed at the start that this wasn't a simple problem, right? People mostly don't sell cars with simple problems.
Checked out the ohms on my ecu plug for the pins you told me to check, each measured to 17.5 ohms and when I grounded them out, I got to 18.5 ohms basically so I’m hoping that’s what it should be. I’m taking the video tonight for the other spark angles.
 
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waltah

10+ Year Contributor
369
154
Mar 2, 2011
fairfield, Virginia
Yes the plug gaps are all the same, .028 I wanted to be sure of that bc I also noticed one of the sparks was weaker than the others. I also thought it was possibly a bad wire but I cleaned the connection from the coil to the wire and thought it might help but it didn’t so I’ll try and get new wires?
Cleaning the connections on a plug wire makes sense. Replacing wires is usually done in sets because whatever has failed -- insulation, the wire itself, or connection to the ferules -- is the same age for all four and it's heat and moisture that kills them. Because there are three parts that can produce the same symptom (weak spark on one plug can be the plug, the wire, or the coil) we'll split the probabilities by swapping the connections at the coil. If the weak spark stays on the same physical plug the trouble is either the plug or the wire -- but wires fail a lot more than plugs so replace the wires first. If the weak spark stays with a coil tower it's the coil so replace that.

What we see is a weak spark but when the engine's running (and especially on boost) it may be no spark at all -- fuel/air mixture is a better insulator than air alone and whatever's eating part of the spark power may then get all of it.
My new injector plugs should be here today so I’ll get all of that wired in along with shooting the two videos, for the other angle for the ignition hv system, should you be able to see the timing belt in that angle if I’m thinking right?
Look at the engine to be sure but I think downward at a 45 degree angle from the front would work. We want to see plugs, wires, and as much as possible of the coils.

Plugs fail with an internal crack in the insulator, coils fail with internal cracks in insulation or on a surface between an HV point and ground. Heat and age lead to cracks in plastic, dirt and moisture do the rest. Seeing even one flash in the wrong place is 'replace that part.'

If you wind up replacing the wires make sure that the boots on both the coil and plug ends fit tightly. They're to keep those connections clean and dry. An advantage of OEM parts for such things is they will fit; aftermarket may or may not.
I also was looking into the ecu repair and found a company on eBay that has a good rep and is $130 for the repair, so I was going to do that and was also trying to get another ecu for a spare.
A spare ECU is a good item to have. Any small part that can can fail completely by surprise but can be changed on the roadside in half an hour -- I keep one of those in a box in the trunk and I always have the basic tools. Maybe you don't want to actually do the repair there but having the option is good.

Every time you change a part there is a risk of adding a new problem -- either a factory defect or an 'oops' when doing the install. So parts should not be changed just in the hope of fixing a problem. Some parts go downhill with age -- timing belts and plug wires are examples -- so 'old' can be enough reason. But when looking for a specific problem it's best to diagnose as far as you can and then pick one part that fits the evidence, change that, and retest.

Your car is complicated enough without adding questions about possibly unnecessary new parts.
After 8 months my '95 GS-T seems to be past complicated stuff. It's dead in the driveway right now with symptoms of a failed starter so that'll be my next car project.
 

98gstJames

Proven Member
111
23
May 25, 2022
Virginia
Cleaning the connections on a plug wire makes sense. Replacing wires is usually done in sets because whatever has failed -- insulation, the wire itself, or connection to the ferules -- is the same age for all four and it's heat and moisture that kills them. Because there are three parts that can produce the same symptom (weak spark on one plug can be the plug, the wire, or the coil) we'll split the probabilities by swapping the connections at the coil. If the weak spark stays on the same physical plug the trouble is either the plug or the wire -- but wires fail a lot more than plugs so replace the wires first. If the weak spark stays with a coil tower it's the coil so replace that.

What we see is a weak spark but when the engine's running (and especially on boost) it may be no spark at all -- fuel/air mixture is a better insulator than air alone and whatever's eating part of the spark power may then get all of it.

Look at the engine to be sure but I think downward at a 45 degree angle from the front would work. We want to see plugs, wires, and as much as possible of the coils.

Plugs fail with an internal crack in the insulator, coils fail with internal cracks in insulation or on a surface between an HV point and ground. Heat and age lead to cracks in plastic, dirt and moisture do the rest. Seeing even one flash in the wrong place is 'replace that part.'

If you wind up replacing the wires make sure that the boots on both the coil and plug ends fit tightly. They're to keep those connections clean and dry. An advantage of OEM parts for such things is they will fit; aftermarket may or may not.

A spare ECU is a good item to have. Any small part that can can fail completely by surprise but can be changed on the roadside in half an hour -- I keep one of those in a box in the trunk and I always have the basic tools. Maybe you don't want to actually do the repair there but having the option is good.

Every time you change a part there is a risk of adding a new problem -- either a factory defect or an 'oops' when doing the install. So parts should not be changed just in the hope of fixing a problem. Some parts go downhill with age -- timing belts and plug wires are examples -- so 'old' can be enough reason. But when looking for a specific problem it's best to diagnose as far as you can and then pick one part that fits the evidence, change that, and retest.

Your car is complicated enough without adding questions about possibly unnecessary new parts.
After 8 months my '95 GS-T seems to be past complicated stuff. It's dead in the driveway right now with symptoms of a failed starter so that'll be my next car project.
The spark plugs are all brand new so that shouldn’t be an issue there, I’ll see about new plugs any good brand you recommended I have vms racing ones on there now and they’re 10.2mm should I just get replacements of those or should they be another brand? Also should I go the eBay route for my ecu repair or should I do the ecmtuning?
 

Dericsh

Supporting Member
1,333
563
Nov 25, 2002
Pearl River, Louisiana
Does ecmlink work on black box? I looked up ceddymods to see if they work on them but their site looks like it got broken and hasn’t been updated in a year. It does have an email you can try on there to contact them.
 

Chri_Evocoupe

Proven Member
39
14
Jun 19, 2022
FAJARDO, Puerto_Rico
Did you try starting Fluid just to see if start?
And do you check the Fuel Pressure?
Some times the injector won't inject enough fuel, or the fuel pump may be are not delivery enough fuel pressure, the fuel pressure can hold the Pressure
 

DSSA

Supporting Vendor
637
441
Jul 26, 2002
Hatfield, Pennsylvania
There's a lot of randomness in this thread going down rabbit holes, and no primary story that makes sense.

Situations like this with customer cars over the last 20+ years, I ask them to start at the beginning of buying the car--did it run? Then what was touched SINCE then if it had.

Injector harnesses? Spark plugs? Spark Plug Wires? ECU? All at once? No....

Give a comprehensive run-down on the whole story, consolidated into one post. It may seem like a waste of time, but after days of this...well...whatever it is...it's probably a more effective plan at this point.

When did it last run? What *EXACTLY* have you changed from that point?

A simple noid light will tell you if you have to replace injector connectors.

Injectors won't CLOG to the point of a "no start" from "started and ran" aspect unless you poured sugar/dirt/diesel in the tank. Not in OP's amount of time.


Spark Plugs won't foul that quickly to go from "running" to "no start" while sitting. Doubtful? Spend $20 on a set of NGK BPR6ES plugs, don't even bother gapping them and toss them in. The car will *START*.

ECU? Possibly--but VERY random that it went from "start/run" to "won't start at all" while sitting there.

Compression? Unless you REALLY whacked the valves on the questionable timing job, it should still START--just run shitty. Compression test will tell you this quickly.
 

98gstJames

Proven Member
111
23
May 25, 2022
Virginia
There's a lot of randomness in this thread going down rabbit holes, and no primary story that makes sense.

Give a comprehensive run-down on the whole story, consolidated into one post. It may seem like a waste of time, but after days of this...well...whatever it is...it's probably a more effective plan at this point.

Alright I’ll go from the first day I bought the car.

When I went to look at the car it would start then but after literally having to turn the key over a couple times and pumping the gas, then it’d start.

Got it home, looked under the hood, saw bad wiring on the battery connection so I decided I’d be fixing that as well, the car also had a very very slight knock which was coming from the piston rod bearings, so I wanted to get that addressed, I only moved car twice with it running, and when it did I put it in gear and you know started trying to drive it and the gas would sputter and sometimes not even do that the car would just act like it stalled out when it didn’t it just didn’t have fuel delivery or something.

Pulled the car into the bay to change all bearings, started the car then, listened to the engine and could hear the smoothness and no knock so I was like sweet, backed it out literally five feet and the positive battery cable melted, so I had to push the car over to my spot.

I’ve gotten it to start since I’ve rewired the battery terminal connections but still the same way as it did before, having to pump the gas a million times and eventually it’d catch.

Done timing, changed spark plugs, checked gap, changed fuel injector plugs bc the connectors were too short from the plugs, fixed a leaking fuel injector on cylinder #4 bc of a lower insulator on the injector itself.

That’s really all that comes off the top of my head at the moment besides tiny tiny stuff.
 
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Chri_Evocoupe

Proven Member
39
14
Jun 19, 2022
FAJARDO, Puerto_Rico
Alright I’ll go from the first day I bought the car.

When I went to look at the car it would start then but after literally having to turn the key over a couple times and pumping the gas, then it’d start.

Got it home, looked under the hood, saw bad wiring on the battery connection so I decided I’d be fixing that as well, the car also had a very very slight knock which was coming from the piston rod bearings, so I wanted to get that addressed, I only moved car twice with it running, and when it did I put it in gear and you know started trying to drive it and the gas would sputter and sometimes not even do that the car would just act like it stalled out when it didn’t it just didn’t have fuel delivery or something.

Pulled the car into the bay to change all bearings, started the car then, listened to the engine and could hear the smoothness and no knock so I was like sweet, backed it out literally five feet and the positive battery cable melted, so I had to push the car over to my spot.

I’ve gotten it to start since I’ve rewired the battery terminal connections but still the same way as it did before, having to pump the gas a million times and eventually it’d catch.

Done timing, changed spark plugs, checked gap, changed fuel injector plugs bc the connectors were too short from the plugs, fixed a leaking fuel injector on cylinder #4 bc of a lower insulator on the injector itself.

That’s really all that comes off the top of my head at the moment besides tiny tiny stuff.
Its posible that when you rewired you miss another cable
 

waltah

10+ Year Contributor
369
154
Mar 2, 2011
fairfield, Virginia
Alright I’ll go from the first day I bought the car.

When I went to look at the car it would start then but after literally having to turn the key over a couple times and pumping the gas, then it’d start.

Got it home, looked under the hood, saw bad wiring on the battery connection so I decided I’d be fixing that as well, the car also had a very very slight knock which was coming from the piston rod bearings, so I wanted to get that addressed, I only moved car twice with it running, and when it did I put it in gear and you know started trying to drive it and the gas would sputter and sometimes not even do that the car would just act like it stalled out when it didn’t it just didn’t have fuel delivery or something.

Pulled the car into the bay to change all bearings, started the car then, listened to the engine and could hear the smoothness and no knock so I was like sweet, backed it out literally five feet and the positive battery cable melted, so I had to push the car over to my spot.

I’ve gotten it to start since I’ve rewired the battery terminal connections but still the same way as it did before, having to pump the gas a million times and eventually it’d catch.

Done timing, changed spark plugs, checked gap, changed fuel injector plugs bc the connectors were too short from the plugs, fixed a leaking fuel injector on cylinder #4 bc of a lower insulator on the injector itself.

That’s really all that comes off the top of my head at the moment besides tiny tiny stuff.

Since I have read all the previous posts on this thread (and written some of them) I will add my $0.02.

James' ECU is dead. One injector seems to get no pulses at all, another one only clicks 'sometimes.' Opening it up he found a burned R701 and at least one overheated trace, both in the injector drive circuit area. The bad cylinders are 2-3. He will send his ecu for repair soon and probably buy a spare.

IN ADDITION, #4 cylinder has a weak spark. That may be a coil, wire or plug and he has done another video to try to pin it down further. I owe a post after I study the video but haven't had time yet -- if someone else does, that might move things along more quickly.

Tonight probably if the rest of life cooperates for a while.

With what looks like three cylinders out of business right now he needs to fix the problems he has rather than looking for new ones --- though it's likely some will turn up when these are fixed.
 
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