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Resolved 2G Timing Belt Tensioner Pulley Question

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sschambers

15+ Year Contributor
143
8
Sep 26, 2007
Hermitage, Pennsylvania
So, according to every manual I've come across, there is a specific way the tensioner pulley is suppose to go on. When the belt is on the cam gears, wrapped around the idler puller and tensioner pulley and wrapped around the pump sprocket and crank sprocket, the tensioner pulley is suppose to be torqued with the small holes to the LEFT of the bolt, both VERTICAL.

I'm re-assembling my motor and it came time to do the timing belt. Well I've tried having the tensioner pulley just like the manual says. The only problem is when I release the pin from the auto-tensioner, there is a TON of slack still left in the belt. So much slack that I can just pull the belt right back off of everything.

I drew up a quick diagram in MSPaint to show you guys what I mean...

The top one is the way the manual SHOWS.

The bottom one is the way I had to put it to get perfect tension on the belt.

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I spun the motor over by hand more times than I can count. Everything spins nicely with no weird noises, everything lines back up to the timing marks.

Is this really going to matter if I keep the tensioner pulley like this? Since it's impossible for me to adjust it so the small holes are vertical.

Thanks,

Steve
 
My last post on this is.

I am gonna assume you know how to get the belt off. Once belt is off and you have compressed tensioner. Everything back in time to tension the belt, turn tensioner pulley using "special" Mitsubishi tool (I do not have. I use a tool I made) if you have it. Set the initial tension (Between 23-25 inch pounds I was wrong earlier had to look this up). Depending on 1g vs 2g , which way you turn pulley. Don't worry about the final location of pulley. It turns for a reason, correct tension is more important then placement. Pull Pin, turn motor over 6 times (if you have balance shafts) that makes a full TDC to TDC with everything. You should then be able to re-insert pin. If you can it is correct. The tensioner is to take up the stretch that is gonna naturally occur.

Sorry for the confusion
 
If you wait to pull the pin you'll save yourself work. If after turning the crank and waiting the pin is still free to move you know that the preload is spot on and you can remove the pin. Otherwise just readjust the preload until you get it right and you won't need to recompress the autotensioner.
 
I know this threads old so i'm hoping someone replies. So just to be sure it is ok for the tensioner to not extend when you pull the pin in fact it should move in and out freely once the tensioner is in place? Second, I am able to get a good amount of tension on the belt but in the process of doing that the belt moves and either throws the block or the head off of time so what I end up with is a perfectly good tensioned built but timing off by a tooth or so. So my question is what is the best method for putting tension on the belt without allowing it to move the gears. My best guess is maybe I have some slack built up on the cam gears or the idler pulley not sure though
 
In order to get the timings correct you need to adjust one of the cam gears of by a tooth beffore tensioning the belt. With this by the time you tension the belt, the tooth will move but it will end up in the correct spot.
 
ok got it makes sense and another question what should you do first the tensioner pulley or put the tensioner on
 
First do the tensioner pulley. then make sure that when you put the tensioner and let go of the pin that the timing marks will move very little. If the timing goes of when you put the tensioner then you will need to re-compress the tensioner. And you don't want to do that.
 
oh ya trust me i've re-compressed that thing so many times haha but ya my biggest challenge is getting the right position for the tensioner pulley becuase if i get it too tight i won't even be able to put the tensioner on or so loose that when the tensioner is fully extended there is still a lot of slack or even perfect tension but like i said before the time gets thrown off but i'll try and do what you said trial and error right
 
How much slack is there when you put the tensioner. It probaly may need to be relpaced.
When i did the timing on my brothers i tensioned the pulley, then when i put the tensioner it made the belt even more tight.
 
not enough slack to pull it off by hand but enough for the belt to slip when you crank it manually
 
ya i just hope it's not me doing something wrong it is my first time so i guess it's expected thanks a lot I'm about to get off work i'll stay posted on it
 
I read a good article and it went something like this; get some long 90DEG needle nose pliers, cut the arms so their short otherwise you will hit the ac compressor and grind the ends so you can fit them in the tensioner pulley holes.

1- Remove the auto tensioner and compress it very slowly in a vise then when the holes are lined up insert a drill bit to keep it inline and reinstall it on the car.

2- Make sure the pivoting arm is against the auto tensioner and use your pliers to rotate the pulley CCW and put tension on it until you can freely slide the drill bit in the auto tensioner in and out, hold it there and torque the pulley bolt.

3- Rotate the engine a couple times and make sure your cam and crank timing marks are lined up then remove the pin and rotate some more and check the how much the auto tensioner is sticking out, it should be right in spec by doing it this way.

I did it about a week ago.

^^^ agreed, seeings how I used this method on a friends MX-3, although i didn't have the pulley problem mentioned above :), only I didn't use a drill bit :p I just had a small cotter pin ROFL

ya i just hope it's not me doing something wrong it is my first time so i guess it's expected thanks a lot I'm about to get off work i'll stay posted on it

Yep first one always has you on your toes, silly interference fit heads, good luck :D
 
II am able to get a good amount of tension on the belt but in the process of doing that the belt moves and either throws the block or the head off of time so what I end up with is a perfectly good tensioned built but timing off by a tooth or so.

http://www.dsmtuners.com/forums/newbie-forum/366362-timing-belt-question.html#post152162301

IMHO, The trick is in making sure you remove all the belt slack as you put it on.

I like to start at the exhaust cam, put the belt on it and clip it into place so it won't slip.
Line the exhaust sprocket timing mark with the mating line between the head and rocker cover. On the intake sprocket back it up about a half tooth and put the belt on it and clip it. The half tooth is just to make it easier to get the belt on the sprocket (give you some slack but not too much). Now move the intake to it's timing mark and make sure the belt is tight. If you can move past the timing mark then it's not on right, fix it. Then clip the belt to this sprocket too so it doesn't move on you.

Do the same for each sprocket. Pull the belt as tight as you can, turn the sprocket counter clockwise a bit to ease getting the belt on and then turn it clockwise to it's mark to make sure it's tight and your on the right tooth.

After doing the crank, all the slack will be between the crank and exhaust sprockets and you take it up with the tensioner pulley, rotating it either clockwise or counterclockwise depending on the engine type to take up that slack and preload the timing belt.

None on the sprockets should move when you do because you have already taken up the slack between each. If your marks don't line up you slipped up somewhere. Start over.
 
Well is was definitely a process but I got it!!!! Only problem was I began to feel a lot more vibration in the cargo hmmmm.....The oil sprocket wasn't in the right revolution causing vibration haha took everything back off and did it again but this time it only took my a quarter of the time! Thanks a lot for the help.
 
Would it matter either way? I did a timing belt on my friends EVO and I spun the tensioner counterclock wise and everything lines up. How does it affect it if you spin it the wrong way?

James :dsm::talon::laser:
Probably way too late but if you have a 6bolt and you rotate the tentioner pulley counterwise the Back side of your tensioner pulley would end up sitting on top of the tensioner arm behind it causing it to grind and stretching your timing belt due to the stress put onto the timing belt
 
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