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1990 Eclipse GSX

DSMPT

DSM Wiseman
2,169
1,753
Jun 12, 2014
Japan / Mexico, Arizona
Belt driven crankcase vacuum pump.
Personally I had been curious how a crankcase vacuum pump on a wet sump engine would affect. I couldn't find any info in here. So a few years ago I decided to experiment myself.
I have played some electric pumps but a belt driven vacuum pump is much better so far. Having a good vacuum in crankcase. This GZ pump is supposed to be mounted in the location of A/C compressor, but I have had the alternator relocated there, plus I didn't want to use the light weight aluminum crank pulley that is supplied in the kit. The vacuum pump has a V-belt pulley, so I removed the power steering pump and mounted it there. And I used the factory 1g power steering pump drive pulley that is on water pump. In this way, I can still keep the Fluidampr and no big modification needed to mount the pump. The pulley ratio slightly changed but it seems didn't affect much. For now, it is making around 4 inHg at idle and 13~15 inHg at high RPM even under boost. Probably I can make it more by adjusting the vacuum regulator but a wet sump engine shouldn't have too much vacuum in crankcase anyway, so I don't think I put more vacuum.
Vacuum pump.jpg
 
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DSMPT

DSM Wiseman
2,169
1,753
Jun 12, 2014
Japan / Mexico, Arizona
Volvo S40 Electro Hydraulic Power Steering, EHPS Pump.

I had been trying to keep the stock belt driven power steering pump as much as I could but I needed that location for a belt driven vacuum pump. So I finally gave up but I am a person who can't stand driving a car without power steering.

This Volvo S40 power steering pump is originally controlled by CAN-Bus VSS, Steering motion and Engine status signals and PWM. So to make it fully functioned, it has to be hacked. But just supply 12v would make the pump worked in some sort of safe mode with 70% motor speed, and that builds enough pressure for my use. I don't road race rally, auto-x etc. Mainly I want the PS while I am parking the car.
There are 2 different style pumps, one-piece style without a reservoir tank and separate reservoir tank style. Both work the same. I choose the one with a separate reservoir tank, because at that time I was planning to mount the pump under driver's side fender and the reservoir tank in the same location as the stock reservoir tank. But I changed the plan and installed it in trunk. In this case I should have chosen the one piece style pump.

Pros:
- It wouldn't cost much to install. Maybe $200~300 for everything including the pump, lines, fittings, wire, fuse.
- Easy to install. Not much wire work is required. (The pump comes with an internal relay)
- You can turn it on/off when you want.
- No need to start the engine when you need PS assistant.

Cons:
- This pump draws a lot of current. My pump draws somewhere between 6A (idle) and 85A (max turn).
- To use it with accessories on streets, it would require a high output alternator. If just for parking purpose, I could use the stock 75A alternator by keeping engine speed a bit higher to avoid engine stall. (With all accessories off)
- Noisy, if install the pump inside.


Volvo S40 electro hydraulic power steering pump.JPG
 
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DSMPT

DSM Wiseman
2,169
1,753
Jun 12, 2014
Japan / Mexico, Arizona
How does the electric power steering pump feel compared to the stock power steering system at idle, city driving, and on the freeway?
I don't feel much difference. Maybe a tiny bit heavier than the stock while driving if comparing to a healthy stock pump but feel slightly lighter at idle since this pump is not counting on engine speed. I can still move the steering wheel by a finger though. Comparing to No PS, the difference is like night and day.
 
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DSMPT

DSM Wiseman
2,169
1,753
Jun 12, 2014
Japan / Mexico, Arizona
6 Bolt 2.2L Aluminum Long Rod Stroker : 1 (4G63, 94mm stroke crank w/ 156mm Rods).

I sometimes see in some DSM groups that somebody asks how to build a aluminum rod engine, and most of time some people start to say "No you can't do that by yourself. You have to ask a machine shop". And start to ridicule the questioner. Yeah ask a machine shop may be better, but it would cost more and it doesn't have to. Definitely you can do that at home, if it's a 88mm stroke 2.0, it wouldn't be that difficult. A stroker would be a bit different story, it would require more work and more things to pay attention than a 88mm stroke 2.0L. But still it can be done at home. Of course at least you have to be capable to properly build a 4g63 by yourself though.
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Mech Addict

Supporting Member
1,101
509
Jun 9, 2019
Jackson, Wyoming
nice photo. I assume this is for weight savings in the rotating assembly, and allows higher revs. What other mods are best to go with a build like that? I imagine simply using aluminum rods on an otherwise stock motor wouldn't be worth the expense. Cam seems like a natural paring, since the benefit is the ability to rev higher, you'd want the power band to also skew higher. What about the balance of the rotating assembly? Anything special with the crank or harmonic balancer? Are you using cast or forged pistons?
 

DSMPT

DSM Wiseman
2,169
1,753
Jun 12, 2014
Japan / Mexico, Arizona
I assume this is for weight savings in the rotating assembly, and allows higher revs.
It's not the only thing but yes with aluminum rods, you can make the weight dramatically lighter, so you can safely go higher rpm than with steel rods, even with a stroker. I even lightened the rods and pistons more, and set the rod/piston/wrist pin combo 871.5g which is about 300g lighter than usual steel rod/forged piston/up grade wrist pin combo. And that 300g difference in each cylinder makes a huge difference in response.
What other mods are best to go with a build like that?
You can go whatever mods you want.
I imagine simply using aluminum rods on an otherwise stock motor wouldn't be worth the expense. Cam seems like a natural paring, since the benefit is the ability to rev higher, you'd want the power band to also skew higher.
Not really since the benefit is not only high rev. Even with stock cams, aluminum rod is beneficial if it suits with your use of car, doesn't matter even if the power band is low. Revving faster is one of the biggest benefit from aluminum rods. Better response, turbo spool faster etc.
What about the balance of the rotating assembly? Anything special with the crank or harmonic balancer? Are you using cast or forged pistons?
Nowadays, most of new parts would come being balanced by manufacturers, so you can actually run without balancing but extra rotating assembly balancing is always beneficial. I use a Fluidampr and the pistons are custom made since there is no off-the-shelf kit for 2.2 long aluminum rod. I usually ask a machine shop to balance the crank and flywheel/clutch if necessary, and balance rods/pistons by myself.
DSC_1826.JPG

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AWD-Tony

Supporting Member
6,796
3,683
Sep 11, 2017
Cincinnati, Ohio
Man Hiroshi! I am blown away by your knowledge and also the ability and willingness to explain thing so a novice like me can comprehend. Much respect!! 🙏🙏
 

DSMPT

DSM Wiseman
2,169
1,753
Jun 12, 2014
Japan / Mexico, Arizona
Water pump modification for filled block. (My own method)

The block is filled like 3/4 but the corner of cylinder #1 in intake side couldn't let enough coolant pass through because the coolant passage is narrower than exhaust side and also some rust in the passage. The air can pass but I didn't think that would be enough for the coolant flow, so I modified the water pump like the pics below instead of going an electric water pump and send the coolant directly to the head coolant ports to support its flow. The exhaust side originally has wider coolant passage and have more flow than intake side.
The car is not daily, mostly for track purpose. but I have driven it on the street several times, 30~60 min for each drive. So far I haven't seen any issues.
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DSMPT

DSM Wiseman
2,169
1,753
Jun 12, 2014
Japan / Mexico, Arizona
Are you 4 bolt rear now?
After I broke the 3 bolt, I was running the 4 bolt. But now I have the driveshaft shop axels.

Haha no way. I don’t believe you after seeing that launch.
I suck at shifting with clutch but I don't use the clutch anymore with a dogbox while shifting, so it looks I am shifting quicker now hahah.
 

Anfurnyy

Supporting Member
382
301
Jul 4, 2020
Rapid City, South_Dakota
6 Bolt 2.2L Aluminum Long Rod Stroker (4G63, 94mm stroke crank w/ 156mm Rods).

I sometimes see in some DSM groups that somebody asks how to build a aluminum rod engine, and most of time some people start to say "No you can't do that by yourself. You have to ask a machine shop". And start to ridicule the questioner. Yeah ask a machine shop may be better, but it would cost more and it doesn't have to. Definitely you can do that at home, if it's a 88mm stroke 2.0, it wouldn't be that difficult. A stroker would be a bit different story, it would require more work and more things to pay attention than a 88mm stroke 2.0L. But still it can be done at home. Of course at least you have to be capable to properly build a 4g63 by yourself though.
View attachment 650105
Whoa hold up. How did you get the oil pickup support mount mounted to the main stud? I thought there wasnt enough thread for the nut to thread on completely?
 

DSMPT

DSM Wiseman
2,169
1,753
Jun 12, 2014
Japan / Mexico, Arizona
Whoa hold up. How did you get the oil pickup support mount mounted to the main stud? I thought there wasnt enough thread for the nut to thread on completely?
There are enough threads left for the nut. I always do this on my builds. You just need to enlarge the hole on the oil pickup bracket.
 

We're on Boost

15+ Year Contributor
1,592
416
Aug 25, 2007
Seattle area, Washington
Hiroshi, I'm curious to know if you needed to make any tweaks to the crankshaft.

When I first started thinking about the Eagle 94mm crank, I was reading in EvoM that there needed to be something done to keep the oilway plugs from vibrating out. This was a problem with old Alfas too, but here we are about a thousand years later LOL

Then on my car, English Racing said they were going to do "something" to it. On the invoice it just says "ER spec 94mm Eagle crank. Mods to make it better". But I don't know what they did. So I've been curious about it ever since.

This is a great thread you have going here!


Gary
 

Anfurnyy

Supporting Member
382
301
Jul 4, 2020
Rapid City, South_Dakota
There are enough threads left for the nut. I always do this on my builds. You just need to enlarge the hole on the oil pickup bracket.
Interesting. Ive enlarged the hole on mine already. Did you set the studs 15mm out passed the girdle? Maybe I forgot to do that with mine when I test fitted it.

I'm against cutting off that 2nd mount because especially without balance shafts, I'd rather not take the risk of having the vibration crack the pickup tube
 
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