Reusing the L19's

Posted by YZFR1, Dec 7, 2011
Newbie Forum - Beginner DSM modification questions and discussions. Common, repetitive, and general discussions will get dumped here from other tech forums. Unless you're a Probationary member you shouldn't post threads here.

  1. YZFR1

    YZFR1 Proven Member

    DSM Profiles:
    1
    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2010
    Posts:
    427
    Likes Received:
    4
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Hello,

    i was wondering if there was any particular limit to how many times i can reuse the l19's or do they even go bad at all?

    Also, if i wanted to check them in spec, would i just use the haynes manual specs or do they have thier own?

    I tried searching some info but couldn't find anything detailed. Thank you

    Best regards!

    Edit: i was talking about not just the head bolts but also the main and rod bolts
    #1
  2. 1bad4g

    1bad4g Proven Member

    DSM Profiles:
    1
    Joined:
    May 2, 2010
    Posts:
    58
    Likes Received:
    0
    baltimore, Kentucky
    you take a standing non streched measurement..and keep a log of how far they have streched after each use.... there should be a log sheet that came with your studs.
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 7, 2011
    #2
  3. Calan

    Calan DSM Wiseman

    DSM Profiles:
    1
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2007
    Posts:
    5,959
    Likes Received:
    107
    OKC, Oklahoma
    Don't forget that L19's are very susceptible to moisture contamination. Always keep them oiled and wrapped, and use latex gloves when handling them to prevent skin moisture from contaminating them.
    #3
  4. 99gst_racer

    99gst_racer Moderator

    DSM Profiles:
    1
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2003
    Posts:
    8,784
    Likes Received:
    125
    Coloma, Michigan
    L19 resists fatigue very well. As long as you never overtorque them and as long as they never become contaminated, you can reuse them over and over again no problem.

    Are these for a 6-bolt or 7-bolt?
    #4
  5. talonDSMerr

    talonDSMerr Proven Member

    DSM Profiles:
    1
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2007
    Posts:
    748
    Likes Received:
    14
    Greenwood, Indiana
    This is the best way to make sure they are reusable. You'd have had to measure the length of the studs/bolts individually when new and write it down. When you go to reuse them, you need to measure them again and compare them to the value when they were new. If they stretched, they have yielded and you shouldn't reuse them.

    But, most don't bother measuring them. ^^ is right when he says if they haven't been torqued above specifications, they should be reusable.
    #5
  6. YZFR1

    YZFR1 Proven Member

    DSM Profiles:
    1
    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2010
    Posts:
    427
    Likes Received:
    4
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Thanks so much guys!!

    They are for a 6 bolt and i did not get a chance to measure them before because i got them as a bonus with a car that came with a blown up 2.34L stroker.

    It's a good thing i haven't really cleaned them up yet, still oily and i will be keeping them this way until ready to use :)

    I got the whole arsenal of measuring tools now, so i'm measuring everything, including the studs!
    #6
  7. 99gst_racer

    99gst_racer Moderator

    DSM Profiles:
    1
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2003
    Posts:
    8,784
    Likes Received:
    125
    Coloma, Michigan
    Torque them to 105 ft/lbs using the 3-step process and moly lube.
    #7
  8. YZFR1

    YZFR1 Proven Member

    DSM Profiles:
    1
    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2010
    Posts:
    427
    Likes Received:
    4
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Ok, i will.

    Also, Moly lube just for the studs or the whole engine assembly?
    #8
  9. 99gst_racer

    99gst_racer Moderator

    DSM Profiles:
    1
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2003
    Posts:
    8,784
    Likes Received:
    125
    Coloma, Michigan
    I was referred to moly lube on the threads of the nut and top of the stud.
    #9
  10. 97gst_spyder

    97gst_spyder Proven Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2008
    Posts:
    1,967
    Likes Received:
    12
    Lakeland, Florida
    Paul, what would the three steps be? 30-60-105?
    #10
  11. 99gst_racer

    99gst_racer Moderator

    DSM Profiles:
    1
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2003
    Posts:
    8,784
    Likes Received:
    125
    Coloma, Michigan
    An exact number doesn't really matter as long as each increment is roughly 1/3 of the final torque number. I'd go 35-70-105.
    #11
  12. bastarddsm

    bastarddsm Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2003
    Posts:
    2,650
    Likes Received:
    28
    Mendota, Illinois
    Do you know why that is? Its inter-granular corrosion, lots of high strength steels are susceptible to this. It can start to rust on the outside, and propagate inward. I've seen metal sample that looked like a hollowed out rotten log from this. Pretty cool stuff.
    #12
  13. YZFR1

    YZFR1 Proven Member

    DSM Profiles:
    1
    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2010
    Posts:
    427
    Likes Received:
    4
    Atlanta, Georgia
    #13
  14. 99gst_racer

    99gst_racer Moderator

    DSM Profiles:
    1
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2003
    Posts:
    8,784
    Likes Received:
    125
    Coloma, Michigan
    #14
  15. YZFR1

    YZFR1 Proven Member

    DSM Profiles:
    1
    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2010
    Posts:
    427
    Likes Received:
    4
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Could someone please confirm if 60 ft lbs is enough torque for the mains?

    Also, i have an analog and a digital dial indicators. Would it be better to use those, to get just the right stud stretch?
    #15
  16. 99gst_racer

    99gst_racer Moderator

    DSM Profiles:
    1
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2003
    Posts:
    8,784
    Likes Received:
    125
    Coloma, Michigan
    60 ft/lbs is correct for ARP main studs. Use moly lube and the 3-step process for those too.

    Dial calipers are fine to measure stud lengths as long as you have a set accurate enough. I know I wouldn't trust mine to accurately measure up to .001" every time.
    #16
  17. YZFR1

    YZFR1 Proven Member

    DSM Profiles:
    1
    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2010
    Posts:
    427
    Likes Received:
    4
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Thanks, onece again 99gst_racer

    I actually meant using a travel dial indicator, like the one on the bore gauge, to measure stud stretch while torqueing the nuts(no way, i would trust a caliper ROFL). Isn't that a more superior way to get the proper torque?

    I can see how that could be hard to do on the head studs, but for the mains and rod bolts, it is definetly more than doable. What do you guys think about that?
    #17

Share This Page