1G Engine out, wiring TLC underway.

Posted by Spector5, Dec 6, 2017 at 8:41 AM

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  1. Spector5

    Spector5 Proven Member

    167
    3
    Joined Jul 31, 2011
    holland, Michigan
    So, engine was pulled out for mechanical issues.... while that’s out, I figured no better time than now to freshen up the 25+ year old weather beaten harness.

    I’ve done plenty of wiring tuck jobs and custom harnesses for other people. However, as usual, my car always gets left out due to time.

    Never being a big fan for how the factory routed the wiring and the materials they used. It left me feeling like it was put together by someone in their backyard right off the showroom floor.

    Obviously, functionality and longevity trumps the visual aesthetic for anyone with half a brain when it comes to wiring.

    After playing around with paper drawings and physically moving the harness how I want it to be. I came up with plan for the harness. Now the engines out and I have time. I have begun the long tedious process of building a harness how I would of like to seen from the factory.

    I decided to reroute the main harness through the heater core area. I deleted the heater assy. So my harness design and routing wouldn’t work for most. However, it works for me.

    Currently to date harness is out and began disassembly and marking the harness.
     

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    Last edited: Dec 6, 2017 at 11:52 AM
    My DSM:
    1991 Eagle Talon TSi AWD

    Street Build

    16g   manual
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  2. brads

    brads DSM Wiseman

    758
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    Joined Oct 24, 2002
    Alta Loma, California
    What materials are you using that are better than stock?
     
    My DSM:
    1995 Mitsubishi Eclipse GSX

    Street Build

      manual
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  3. boostdawd

    boostdawd Proven Member

    957
    236
    Joined Apr 6, 2010
    phoenix, Arizona
    I went through putting my harness together as well. Trying to clean up the bay and interior. Deleted unnecessary things like egr, ac, etc.

    This is a budget build mind u but I think it came out pretty good for my first try. I used a combination of solder, heatshrink tubing, electrical tape and expandable braided sleeving for the engine bay. Also ran it through the heater core. For the interior I used tesa wire loom tape.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2017 at 2:24 AM
    My DSM:
    1991 Eagle Talon TSi AWD

    Drag Race Build

    GT35   manual
    1992 Mitsubishi Eclipse GSX

    Street Build

    16g   manual
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    Spector5 likes this.
  4. Spector5

    Spector5 Proven Member

    167
    3
    Joined Jul 31, 2011
    holland, Michigan
    The type of wiring used in 91’ compared to todays options is a no brainer. It’s the first thing that will be changed.

    It’s a outdated gtp type wire. As you can see doesn’t hold up more than a decade. From the constant heat and cooling effect in the engine bay and fluids coming into contact with it. Almost all dsm harnesses I’ve ever seen to include mine are extreme stiff and brittle.

    I will be using factory Oem replacement connectors and pins from Sheridan engineering.

    From the factory, they sealed up the connectors but then left the battery, starter cables and other wiring exposed to the elements.

    They used good material for what was available in that time frame. However it is very outdated to modern spec.

    I will be using shrink tube over nylon braided loom instead of the plastic loom that falls victim to the same issues as wiring. The loom becomes brittle and then breaks off.

    They used more electrical tape than 3m can make in our harnesses. That to over time unravels and becomes brittle.

    No matter what we use it won’t last forever, but there is definitely more reliable and efficient materials to use over factory materials.

    One thing to keep in mind is solder vs butt/crimp connectors. Everyone was taught to solder their connections or repairs. I was even taught that by my tech school, mentors, etc. however, This has went from personal preference(debates) to the new performance world industry standard to crimp connections. There’s a lot of great articles that explain why that Is, I would spend all day explaining it, LOL.

    I use a bare connector, and individual shrink tube. A lot of guys like the perm-seal version. As it’s already coated with the heat shrink. Most fail to realize that if not done properly. You will penetrate the heat shrink when crimping the connector. Pretty much defeating the purpose of the shrink. Causing premature wiring issues.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 12, 2017 at 12:22 PM
    My DSM:
    1991 Eagle Talon TSi AWD

    Street Build

    16g   manual
    Loading...
  5. brads

    brads DSM Wiseman

    758
    43
    Joined Oct 24, 2002
    Alta Loma, California
    Sounds like a good plan. I guess I will be getting an order from you sometime soon ;)

    Are you meaning shrink tube along the whole length? Or just at the joints? If the nylon braided loom is exposed, it can get dirt trapped in it. Then it will act like sandpaper on the wires. Not as big a problem on a race car thats going to be run a season or two, but a definite concern if you are trying to make something last long.

    I didn't have issues with solder splices I made, but I have had them fail when someone else was building a harness I designed. The trick to getting them to live is to make sure that the solder doesn't wick down the wire. And then also to support the wire all along that, so there is no bending at all around the joint. It's easier and safer to crimp, I wouldn't design a solder splice into any new harnesses I make.
     
    My DSM:
    1995 Mitsubishi Eclipse GSX

    Street Build

      manual
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    1990TSIAWDTALON and Spector5 like this.
  6. Spector5

    Spector5 Proven Member

    167
    3
    Joined Jul 31, 2011
    holland, Michigan
    Don’t get me
    I’m still learning how to use the nylon braided loom. That’s really good to know how it traps debri! However, the “sand paper” rubbing affect could be said for plastic loom as well.

    I’m not against plastic loom, electrical tape, or even solder. I just think a lot of it is over used, better ways or even aesthetically pleasing. Also, quality of materials as in even brand of electrical tape. I’ve used expensive 3m and the cheapest possible from a harbor freight.... I’ve had bad experience with the cheaper tape as it seems to come unraveled within the same day I use it. It just seems people get carried away with electrical tape. If you can’t wrap a joint or loom end correctly it sticks out like a sore thumb. people use zip ties to secure the loom to the wiring. Nothing wrong with it, but doesn’t look very professional.

    “My plan” LOL, is to electrical tape the wire harness itself to hold it together and to add a barrier. Nylon braid over top, then heat shrink joints and ends. New pins, connectors and

    I should rephrase myself by saying there’s really no right or wrong way to to build a harness as long as it works for its given purpose.
     
    My DSM:
    1991 Eagle Talon TSi AWD

    Street Build

    16g   manual
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